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The real cost of credit constraints: Evidence from micro-finance

Author

Listed:
  • Renuka Sane

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

  • Susan Thomas

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

Abstract

In December 2010, the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh passed a law that severely restricted the operations of micro-finance institutions and brought the micro-finance industry to an abrupt halt. We measure the impact of micro-credit withdrawal in this unique natural experiment and find that average household expenditure dropped by 19 percent relative to a control group after the ban. The largest decrease was observed in expenditure on food. There is some evidence of higher volatility in consumption after the ban. All households were affected and not just the borrower households, which may suggest general equilibrium effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Renuka Sane & Susan Thomas, 2013. "The real cost of credit constraints: Evidence from micro-finance," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2013-013, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2013-013
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    Cited by:

    1. Saxena, Vibhor & Bindal, Ishaan & LeMay-Boucher, Philippe, 2020. "Social groups and credit shocks: Evidence of inequalities in consumption smoothing," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 311-326.
    2. Vibhor Saxena & Ishaan Bindal & Philippe LeMay-Boucher, 2019. "Social groups and credit shocks: Evidence of inequalities in consumption smoothing," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance 201901, School of Economics and Finance, University of St Andrews.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Consumption smoothing; credit; household finance; micro-finance ban; natural experiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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