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Explaining Global Financial Imbalances: A Critique of the Saving Glut and Reserve Currency Hypotheses

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  • Thomas I. Palley

Abstract

This paper examines three different explanations of the global financial imbalances. It begins with the neoliberal globalization hypothesis that explains the imbalances as the product of the model of globalization implemented over the past thirty years. It then examines the saving glut and reserve currency hypotheses. The paper concludes by arguing that both the saving glut and reserve currency hypotheses are inconsistent with the empirical record and both provide a misleading guide for policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas I. Palley, 2011. "Explaining Global Financial Imbalances: A Critique of the Saving Glut and Reserve Currency Hypotheses," IMK Working Paper 13-2011, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:imk:wpaper:13-2011
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    File URL: http://www.boeckler.de/pdf/p_imk_wp_13_2011.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jan Kregel, 2010. "An Alternative Perspective on Global Imbalances and International Reserve Currencies," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_116, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Thomas I. Palley, 2006. "The Fallacy of the Revised Bretton Woods Hypothesis: Why Today’s System is Unsustainable and Suggestions for a Replacement," Working Papers wp114, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas I. Palley, 2013. "Global imbalances and the Revised Bretton Woods hypothesis: Wrong before the crisis and wrong after," IMK Working Paper 108-2013, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    2. Thomas I. Palley, 2013. "Gattopardo economics: the crisis and the mainstream response of change that keeps things the same," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 10(2), pages 193-206.
    3. Laura Barbosa de Carvalho, 2012. "Current Account Imbalances and Economic Growth: a two-country model with real-financial linkages," Working Papers 1203, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.

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