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A Thematic Mobility Measure for Econometric Analysis

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Although the concept of interdisciplinary research and interdisciplinary (cognitive) mobility is well established and has become a requisite in research policy, we still know little about the researchers that work at these boundaries or about the consequences for disciplinary fields. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe migration patterns across and within scientific fields. The indicators and tools developed in this context can inform policy-making and help to assess the effectiveness of grant schemes that aim to foster interdisciplinary mobility.

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  • Lawson, Cornelia & Soós,Sándor, 2014. "A Thematic Mobility Measure for Econometric Analysis," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201408, University of Turin.
  • Handle: RePEc:uto:dipeco:201408
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    Cited by:

    1. Fernandez-Zubieta, Ana & Geuna, Aldo & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "What do We Know of the Mobility of Research Scientists and of its Impact on Scientific Production," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201522, University of Turin.
    2. Lawson, Cornelia & Geuna, Aldo & Ana Fernández-Zubieta & Toselli, Manuel & Kataishi, Rodrigo, 2015. "International Careers of Researchers in Biomedical Sciences: A Comparison of the US and the UK," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201514, University of Turin.

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