IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cwl/cwldpp/994r.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Price Flexibility and Output Stability: An Old Keynesian View

Author

Abstract

The central macroeconomic issue is the same as ever. How reliable are automatic market adjustments in maintaining full employment equilibrium in the face of aggregate demand shocks? Many modern theorists assume that nominal prices, including wages, jump instantaneously to keep supply and demand equal in all markets. No excess supply, no involuntary unemployment, can ever arise. However, since actual price adjustments take real time, greater flexibility can be destabilizing. "Real balance" effects are overrated, and the demand effects of nominal price changes are perverse. Activist macro policies are necessary, as Keynes argued, even though nominal prices are far from rigid.

Suggested Citation

  • James Tobin, 1991. "Price Flexibility and Output Stability: An Old Keynesian View," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 994R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Sep 1991.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:994r Note: CFP 834.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cowles.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/pub/d09/d0994-r.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Plosser, Charles I, 1989. "Understanding Real Business Cycles," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 51-77, Summer.
    2. James Tobin, 1955. "A Dynamic Aggregative Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63, pages 103-103.
    3. Russell Cooper & Andrew John, 1988. "Coordinating Coordination Failures in Keynesian Models," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(3), pages 441-463.
    4. Chadha, Binky, 1989. "Is Increased Price Inflexibility Stabilizing?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 481-497, November.
    5. Dudley Dillard, 1988. "The Barter Illusion in Classical and Neoclassical Economics," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 14(4), pages 299-318, Oct-Dec.
    6. Fischer, Stanley, 1977. "Long-Term Contracts, Rational Expectations, and the Optimal Money Supply Rule," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(1), pages 191-205, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Aggregate demand; sticky prices;

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:994r. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Matthew Regan). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cowleus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.