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World on the Move: The Changing Global Income Distribution and Its Implications for Consumption Patterns and Public Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Tomas Hellebrandt

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Paolo Mauro

    () (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

In the next two decades, hundreds of millions of people in emerging economies are projected to reach income levels at which they will be able to afford cars and air travel. As purchasing power increases worldwide, people will spend proportionately less on food and beverages and more on transportation. Higher spending on transportation, especially in China, India, and Sub-Saharan Africa, will increase pressures on the infrastructure in these economies and aggravate global climate change. Governments will need to respond to these challenges in a fiscally sustainable and environmentally responsible way.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas Hellebrandt & Paolo Mauro, 2015. "World on the Move: The Changing Global Income Distribution and Its Implications for Consumption Patterns and Public Policies," Policy Briefs PB15-21, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:pbrief:pb15-21
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    File URL: https://piie.com/publications/policy-briefs/world-move-changing-global-income-distribution-and-its-implications
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2007. "The Economic Lives of the Poor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 141-168, Winter.
    2. Joyce Dargay & Dermot Gately & Martin Sommer, 2007. "Vehicle Ownership and Income Growth, Worldwide: 1960-2030," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 143-170.
    3. Marcos Chamon & Paolo Mauro & Yohei Okawa, 2008. "Mass car ownership in the emerging market giants," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 23, pages 243-296, April.
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