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The migration network effect on international trade

Listed author(s):
  • Rodolfo Metulini

    ()

    (IMT Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies)

  • Paolo Sgrignoli

    ()

    (IMT Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies)

  • Stefano Schiavo

    (Department of Economics and Management, University of Trento)

  • Massimo Riccaboni

    ()

    (IMT Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies)

This paper studies the relationship between migration and trade, with the aim of measuring both direct and indirect network effects. We analyze trade of diferentiated and homogeneous goods using an econometric approach inspired by spatial econometrics, proposing a new way to define country neighbors based on the most intense links in the migration network. We find that migration significantly affects trade across categories both in direct and in indirect way. The indirect impact highlights a stronger competitive effect of third country migrants for homogeneous goods. We also confirm that the effect of migration channels is higher on differentiated goods.

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File URL: http://eprints.imtlucca.it/2193/1/EIC_WP_5_2014.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
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Paper provided by IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca in its series Working Papers with number 5/2014.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: May 2014
Date of revision: May 2014
Publication status: Published in EIC working paper series
Handle: RePEc:ial:wpaper:5/2014
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Web page: http://eprints.imtlucca.it/

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  1. Massimiliano Bratti & Luca Benedictis & Gianluca Santoni, 2014. "On the pro-trade effects of immigrants," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(3), pages 557-594, August.
  2. Murat Genc & Masood Gheasi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2012. "The impact of immigration on international trade: a meta-analysis," Chapters, in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 9, pages 301-337 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  3. Mariya Aleksynska & Giovanni Peri, 2014. "Isolating the Network Effect of Immigrants on Trade," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 434-455, 03.
  4. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
  5. Bramoullé, Yann & Djebbari, Habiba & Fortin, Bernard, 2009. "Identification of peer effects through social networks," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(1), pages 41-55, May.
  6. Massimo Riccaboni & Alessandro Rossi & Stefano Schiavo, 2013. "Global networks of trade and bits," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 8(1), pages 33-56, April.
  7. Giovanni Peri & Francisco Requena-Silvente, 2010. "The trade creation effect of immigrants: evidence from the remarkable case of Spain," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 43(4), pages 1433-1459, November.
  8. Mayer, Thierry & Zignago, Soledad, 2006. "Notes on CEPII’s distances measures," MPRA Paper 26469, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Caglar Ozden & Christopher R. Parsons & Maurice Schiff & Terrie L. Walmsley, 2011. "Where on Earth is Everybody? The Evolution of Global Bilateral Migration 1960-2000," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 12-56, May.
  10. James P. LeSage & R. Kelley Pace, 2008. "Spatial Econometric Modeling Of Origin-Destination Flows," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(5), pages 941-967.
  11. Baltagi, Badi H. & Egger, Peter & Pfaffermayr, Michael, 2007. "Estimating models of complex FDI: Are there third-country effects?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 260-281, September.
  12. Ehrhart, Helene & Le Goff, Maelan & Rocher?, Emmanuel & Singh, Raju Jan, 2014. "Does migration foster exports ? evidence from Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6739, The World Bank.
  13. Gould, David M, 1994. "Immigrant Links to the Home Country: Empirical Implications for U.S. Bilateral Trade Flows," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 302-316, May.
  14. Keith Head & John Ries, 1998. "Immigration and Trade Creation: Econometric Evidence from Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(1), pages 47-62, February.
  15. A. Porojan, 2001. "Trade Flows and Spatial Effects: The Gravity Model Revisited," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 265-280, July.
  16. Stefania Lionetti & Roberto Patuelli, 2009. "Trading Cultural Goods in the Era of Digital Piracy," Working Paper Series 40_09, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Sep 2010.
  17. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Haiyan Deng & Alyson C. Ma & Hengyong Mo, 2005. "World Trade Flows: 1962-2000," NBER Working Papers 11040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Luc Anselin & Daniel Arribas-Bel, 2013. "Spatial fixed effects and spatial dependence in a single cross-section," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 92(1), pages 3-17, 03.
  19. James P. LeSage & Christine Thomas-Agnan, 2015. "Interpreting Spatial Econometric Origin-Destination Flow Models," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 188-208, 03.
  20. Elhorst, J. Paul & Lacombe, Donald J. & Piras, Gianfranco, 2012. "On model specification and parameter space definitions in higher order spatial econometric models," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 211-220.
  21. J. Elhorst, 2010. "Applied Spatial Econometrics: Raising the Bar," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 9-28.
  22. LeSage, James P. & Pace, Robert Kelley, 2011. "Pitfalls in Higher Order Model Extensions of Basic Spatial Regression Methodology," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 41(1), pages 13-26, Summer.
  23. Ron Johnston & Les Hepple & Tony Hoare & Kelvyn Jones & Paul Plummer, 2003. "The Mistreated Model: Some Technical Comments on Porojan's Paper on 'Trade Flows and Spatial Effects'," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 11-14, January.
  24. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 2002. "Ethnic Chinese Networks In International Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 116-130, February.
  25. Lung-fei Lee & Xiaodong Liu & Xu Lin, 2010. "Specification and estimation of social interaction models with network structures," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 13(2), pages 145-176, 07.
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