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How Income Mobility and Income Growth Explain Income Inequality Trends

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  • Nicolas Herault

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne)

Abstract

Jenkins and Van Kerm (2006) show how income inequality trends can be explained by income mobility and the equalising effect of panel-income changes. This paper extends their framework to show explicitly how the distributional effect of panel-income changes depends on the respective size and distribution of income gains and losses. An application to US data illustrates the contribution of the approach. One of the new insights of the application to US data for the 1970/2009 period is that most of the equalising effect of income growth occurs through income gains rather than income losses even in times of recession. The analysis also reveals some interesting trends regarding income mobility and the business cycle. Classification-D31, D63

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolas Herault, 2015. "How Income Mobility and Income Growth Explain Income Inequality Trends," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2015n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2015n14
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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2015n14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen P. Jenkins & Philippe Van Kerm, 2006. "Trends in income inequality, pro-poor income growth, and income mobility," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 531-548, July.
    2. Philippe Van Kerm, 2013. "Repeated half-sample bootstrap resampling," United Kingdom Stata Users' Group Meetings 2013 10, Stata Users Group.
    3. Quentin Wodon, 2001. "Income mobility and risk during the business cycle: Comparing adjustments in labour markets in two Latin‐American countries," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 9(2), pages 449-461, July.
    4. Markus Jäntti & Ravi Kanbur & Milla Nyyssölä & Jukka Pirttilä, 2014. "Poverty and Welfare Measurement on the Basis of Prospect Theory," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(1), pages 182-205, March.
    5. Rolf Aaberge & Magne Mogstad, 2014. "Income mobility as an equalizer of permanent income," Discussion Papers 769, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    6. Kakwani, Nanok C, 1977. "Measurement of Tax Progressivity: An International Comparison," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 87(345), pages 71-80, March.
    7. Lambert, Peter J, 1985. "On the Redistributive Effect of Taxes and Benefits," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 32(1), pages 39-54, February.
    8. Gary Fields, 2010. "Does income mobility equalize longer-term incomes? New measures of an old concept," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 8(4), pages 409-427, December.
    9. Gulgun Bayaz-Ozturk & Richard V. Burkhauser & Kenneth A. Couch, 2014. "Consolidating The Evidence On Income Mobility In The Western States Of Germany And The United States From 1984 To 2006," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 431-443, January.
    10. Wojciech Kopczuk & Emmanuel Saez & Jae Song, 2010. "Earnings Inequality and Mobility in the United States: Evidence from Social Security Data Since 1937," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(1), pages 91-128.
    11. Shorrocks, Anthony, 1978. "Income inequality and income mobility," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 376-393, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kailash Chandra Pradhan and Shrabani Mukherjee, 2018. "The Income Transition in Rural India: Evidence from Aris/Reds Surveys," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 45-66, June.

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    Keywords

    Income inequality; income mobility; income growth;
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