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Exploring the relation between income mobility and inequality at the regional level using EU-SILC microdata

Author

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  • Zbigniew Mogila
  • Patricia C. Melo
  • José M. Gaspar

Abstract

This paper investigates empirically the impact of labour-related income inequality on income mobility in French and Spanish NUTS2 regions. We explore whether the negative relation between income inequality and mobility - known as the Great Gatsby Curve - is also present in the short and medium run. Using longitudinal microdata from the EU-SILC, we construct NUTS2-level measures of relative income mobility from transition matrices between income deciles for 2-year and 4-year income trajectories and measures of income inequality based on the Gini index and inter-decile ratios. We then combine these measures with other regional-level factors and implement regression models to test the relation between income inequality and income mobility. The regional perspective allows us to investigate the extent to which territorial heterogeneity may also affect income mobility. The findings from the regression analyses do not provide evidence of a significant relationship between income mobility and income inequality,at least when considering mobility over the short-to-medium term (i.e. up to 4 years).

Suggested Citation

  • Zbigniew Mogila & Patricia C. Melo & José M. Gaspar, 2020. "Exploring the relation between income mobility and inequality at the regional level using EU-SILC microdata," Working Papers REM 2020/0134, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
  • Handle: RePEc:ise:remwps:wp01342020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Durlauf, Steven N. & Kourtellos, Andros & Tan, Chih Ming, 2021. "The Great Gatsby Curve," SocArXiv mrw9y, Center for Open Science.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    income inequality; income mobility; territorial heterogeneity; the Great Gatsby Curve;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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