IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Income Inequality, Trade and Financial Openness

Listed author(s):
  • G. C. Lim

    ()

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Paul D. McNelis

    (Department of Finance, Graduate School of Business Administration, Fordham University)

This paper examines the relationships between the Gini coefficient, trade-openness, foreign aid and foreign direct investment flows. Panel data estimates show that trade openness can be effective for changing income inequality, but its effectiveness depends on the stage of development. Simulation results show that the Gini and openness can be negatively or positively correlated — it depends on the capital intensity and on the degree of openness. Overall, the results suggest that trade and financial openness can be effective policies for reducing inequality in low income countries, if they significantly increase the marginal productivity of labour through capital intensive methods of production.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2014n07.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne in its series Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series with number wp2014n07.

as
in new window

Length: 31pp
Date of creation: Mar 2014
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2014n07
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia

Phone: +61 3 8344 2100
Fax: +61 3 8344 2111
Web page: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(1), pages 121-144, May.
  2. Marie Daumal, 2013. "The Impact of Trade Openness on Regional Inequality: The Cases of India and Brazil," The International Trade Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 243-280, August.
  3. Manthos D. Delis & Iftekhar Hasan & Pantelis Kazakis, 2014. "Bank Regulations and Income Inequality: Empirical Evidence," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 18(5), pages 1811-1846.
  4. Muhammad Tariq MAJEED, 2010. "Inequality, Trade Openness And Economic Growth In Asia," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 10(2).
  5. Julien Gourdon & Nicolas Maystre & Jaime de Melo, 2015. "Openness, Inequality and Poverty: Endowments Matter," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Developing Countries in the World Economy, chapter 20, pages 497-532 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
  6. Correia, Isabel H., 1999. "On the efficiency and equity trade-off," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 581-603, December.
  7. Isaac Ehrlich & Jinyoung Kim, 2007. "The Evolution of Income and Fertility Inequalities over the Course of Economic Development: A Human Capital Perspective," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 137-174.
  8. Hirschman, Albert O., 1973. "The changing tolerance for income inequality in the course of economic development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 1(12), pages 29-36, December.
  9. William Easterly, 2007. "Was Development Assistance a Mistake?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 328-332, May.
  10. Anderson, Edward, 2005. "Openness and inequality in developing countries: A review of theory and recent evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1045-1063, July.
  11. Isabel Correia, 2010. "Consumption Taxes and Redistribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(4), pages 1673-1694, September.
  12. Basu, Parantap & Guariglia, Alessandra, 2007. "Foreign Direct Investment, inequality, and growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 824-839, December.
  13. Jaume Ventura & Francesco Caselli, 2000. "A Representative Consumer Theory of Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 909-926, September.
  14. Lim, G. C. & McNelis, Paul D., 2013. "Alternative Government Spending Rules: Effects On Income Inequality And Welfare," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(07), pages 1496-1518, October.
  15. Chen, Yu-chin & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2010. "Growth and inequality in a small open economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 497-514, June.
  16. David Dollar & Aart Kraay, 2004. "Trade, Growth, and Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 22-49, 02.
  17. García-Peñalosa, Cecilia & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2009. "The Dynamics Of Wealth Inequality In A Simple Ramsey Model: A Note On The Role Of Production Flexibility," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(02), pages 250-262, April.
  18. Canova, Fabio & Paustian, Matthias, 2011. "Business cycle measurement with some theory," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(4), pages 345-361.
  19. Serpil Bouza & Stephen J. Turnovsky, 2012. "The distributional consequences of foreign transfers: do they reduce or exacerbate inequality?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 702-735, October.
  20. Frederick Solt, 2009. "Standardizing the World Income Inequality Database," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 90(2), pages 231-242.
  21. Acar, Sevil & Dogruel, Fatma, 2012. "Sources of inequality in selected MENA countries," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 276-285.
  22. Atkinson, Anthony B., 1970. "On the measurement of inequality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 244-263, September.
  23. Kristin J. Forbes, 2000. "A Reassessment of the Relationship between Inequality and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 869-887, September.
  24. Chris Papageorgiou & Subir Lall & Florence Jaumotte, 2008. "Rising Income Inequality; Technology, or Trade and Financial Globalization?," IMF Working Papers 08/185, International Monetary Fund.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2014n07. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Abbey Treloar)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.