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Behavioral and Performance Consequences of U.S. Executive Equity Compensation and Ownership

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  • Robert Grams

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Abstract

Logic and some empirical findings suggest that the consequences of the level of executive ownership and the size of stock option grants have non-monotic relations to firm performance. The size of option grants now typical in the U.S. is likely to encourage an excessive level of risk taking. Stock options are not an effective means of increasing executive ownership and are generally less efficient than full-value grants when comparing opportunity cost to the company and initial psychological value to the executive. Implications for research and compensation design are noted.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Grams, "undated". "Behavioral and Performance Consequences of U.S. Executive Equity Compensation and Ownership," Working Papers 0803, Human Resources and Labor Studies, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities Campus).
  • Handle: RePEc:hrr:papers:0803
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    File URL: http://www.legacy-irc.csom.umn.edu/RePEC/hrr/papers/0803.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hall, Brian J. & Murphy, Kevin J., 2002. "Stock options for undiversified executives," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 3-42, February.
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    3. Himmelberg, Charles P. & Hubbard, R. Glenn & Palia, Darius, 1999. "Understanding the determinants of managerial ownership and the link between ownership and performance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 353-384, September.
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    6. Sudip Datta, 2001. "Executive Compensation and Corporate Acquisition Decisions," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(6), pages 2299-2336, December.
    7. Kevin J. Murphy & Brian J. Hall, 2000. "Optimal Exercise Prices for Executive Stock Options," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 209-214, May.
    8. Brian J. Hall & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 1998. "Are CEOs Really Paid Like Bureaucrats?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(3), pages 653-691.
    9. Benjamin E. Hermalin & Michael S. Weisbach, 1991. "The Effects of Board Composition and Direct Incentives on Firm Performance," Financial Management, Financial Management Association, vol. 20(4), Winter.
    10. Keith D. Harvey & Ronald E. Shrieves, 2001. "Executive Compensation Structure And Corporate Governance Choices," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 24(4), pages 495-512, December.
    11. Huddart, Steven & Lang, Mark, 1996. "Employee stock option exercises an empirical analysis," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 5-43, February.
    12. Agrawal, Anup & Jaffe, Jeffrey F & Mandelker, Gershon N, 1992. " The Post-merger Performance of Acquiring Firms: A Re-examination of an Anomaly," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1605-1621, September.
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