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Vacancy Matching and Labor Market Conditions

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  • Stadin, Karolina

    () (Department of Economics)

Abstract

This paper studies the probability of filling a vacancy, how it varies with the number of unemployed and number of vacancies in the local labor market, and what impact it has on employment. A greater availability of unemployed workers should make it easier for a firm to fill a vacancy but more vacancies at other firms should make it more difficult, due to the congestion effect. I use monthly panel data for all local labor markets in Sweden from 1992-2011. The results suggest that unemployment has a weak positive effect on the probability of filling a vacancy, while the number of vacancies in the local labor market has a significant and robust negative effect. Simulations of a theoretical model, with parameters based on the estimation, show economically significant effects of shocks to the number of vacancies on employment dynamics, while shocks to the number of unemployed are not very important. Matching frictions are more important for employment during booms than during recessions.

Suggested Citation

  • Stadin, Karolina, 2012. "Vacancy Matching and Labor Market Conditions," Working Paper Series 2012:16, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:uunewp:2012_016
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Forslund, Anders & Johansson, Kerstin, 2007. "Random and stock-flow models of labour market matching - Swedish evidence," Working Paper Series 2007:11, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    2. Mikael Carlsson & Jon Smedsaas, 2007. "Technology Shocks and the Labor-Input Response: Evidence from Firm-Level Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(6), pages 1509-1520, September.
    3. Pascal Michaillat, 2012. "Do Matching Frictions Explain Unemployment? Not in Bad Times," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1721-1750, June.
    4. Blatter, Marc & Muehlemann, Samuel & Schenker, Samuel, 2012. "The costs of hiring skilled workers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 20-35.
    5. Coles, Melvyn G & Smith, Eric, 1996. "Cross-Section Estimation of the Matching Function: Evidence from England and Wales," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(252), pages 589-597, November.
    6. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, January.
    7. Eran Yashiv, 2000. "The Determinants of Equilibrium Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(5), pages 1297-1322, December.
    8. Mikael Carlsson & Stefan Eriksson & Nils Gottfries, 2013. "Product market imperfections and employment dynamics," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 447-470, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Vacancies; Unemployment; Matching; Labor demand; Employment dynamics; Business cycle;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E39 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Other
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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