IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/uunewp/2008_005.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does Self Help Group Participation Lead to Asset Creation?

Author

Listed:
  • Bali Swain, Ranjula

    (Department of Economics)

  • Varghese, Adel

    (IFMR & Texas A & M University)

Abstract

We evaluate the effect of Self Help Group participation on a long term impact parameter, namely asset creation. Indian Self Help Groups (SHGs)are unique in that they are mainly NGO-formed microfinance groups but later funded by commercial banks. The results reveal that longer membership in SHGs positively impacts asset creation, robust to various asset specifications. With longer participation in SHGs, members move away from pure agriculture as an income source towards other sources such as livestock income. Training by NGOs positively impacts asset creation but the type of SHG linkage per se has no effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Bali Swain, Ranjula & Varghese, Adel, 2008. "Does Self Help Group Participation Lead to Asset Creation?," Working Paper Series 2008:5, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:uunewp:2008_005
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://uu.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:44142/FULLTEXT01.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ahlin, Christian & Jiang, Neville, 2008. "Can micro-credit bring development?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 1-21, April.
    2. Xavier Giné & Pamela Jakiela & Dean Karlan & Jonathan Morduch, 2010. "Microfinance Games," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 60-95, July.
    3. repec:pri:rpdevs:morduch_microfinance_poor is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Beatriz Armendariz & Jonathan Morduch, 2007. "The Economics of Microfinance," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262512017.
    5. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
    6. Shahidur R. Khandker, 2005. "Microfinance and Poverty: Evidence Using Panel Data from Bangladesh," The World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 19(2), pages 263-286.
    7. Gwendolyn Alexander Tedeschi, 2008. "Overcoming Selection Bias in Microcredit Impact Assessments: A Case Study in Peru," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(4), pages 504-518, April.
    8. Coleman, Brett E., 1999. "The impact of group lending in Northeast Thailand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 105-141, October.
    9. Jonathan Morduch, 1998. "Does Microfinance Really Help the Poor? New Evidence from Flagship Programs in Bangladesh," Working Papers 198, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    10. Coleman, Brett E., 2006. "Microfinance in Northeast Thailand: Who benefits and how much?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(9), pages 1612-1638, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Hisaki KONO & Kazushi TAKAHASHI, 2010. "Microfinance Revolution: Its Effects, Innovations, And Challenges," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 48(1), pages 15-73, March.
    2. Heiko Fritz & Guenter Lang, 2012. "Microcredit, Human Capital, and Personal Income Distribution: Empirical Evidence from Greater Cairo," Working Papers 30, The German University in Cairo, Faculty of Management Technology.
    3. Ghulam Hussain, A.K.M. & Nargis, Nigar & Ashiquzzaman, S.M. & Khalil, Fahad, 2019. "The employment impact of microcredit program participation in Bangladesh: Evidence from a longitudinal household survey," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 34-49.
    4. Gunhild Berg, 2010. "Evaluating The Impacts Of Microsaving: The Case Of Sewa Bank In India," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 35(1), pages 75-96, March.
    5. Kadyrbek Sultakeev & Kamalbek Karymshakov & Burulcha Sulaimanova, 2018. "The Impact Of Microfinance On Entrepreneurship In Kyrgyzstan," Acta Oeconomica Pragensia, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2018(2), pages 24-40.
    6. Maren Duvendack & Richard Palmer-Jones, 2012. "High Noon for Microfinance Impact Evaluations: Re-investigating the Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(12), pages 1864-1880, December.
    7. Akotey, Joseph Oscar & Adjasi, Charles K.D., 2016. "Does Microcredit Increase Household Welfare in the Absence of Microinsurance?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 380-394.
    8. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2009. "Finance and Inequality: Theory and Evidence," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 287-318, November.
    9. Rajbanshi, Ram & Huang, Meng & Wydick, Bruce, 2015. "Measuring Microfinance: Assessing the Conflict between Practitioners and Researchers with Evidence from Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 30-47.
    10. Gutiérrez-Nieto, Begoña & Serrano-Cinca, Carlos, 2019. "20 years of research in microfinance: An information management approach," International Journal of Information Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 183-197.
    11. Scott Fulford, 2010. "The effects of financial development in the short and long run," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 741, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 31 May 2011.
    12. Kazushi TAKAHASHI & Takayuki HIGASHIKATA & Kazunari TSUKADA, 2010. "The Short‐Term Poverty Impact Of Small‐Scale, Collateral‐Free Microcredit In Indonesia: A Matching Estimator Approach," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 48(1), pages 128-155, March.
    13. Khan, Md Faisal Abedin & Uddin, Md Sazib & Giessen, Lukas, 2021. "Microcredit expansion and informal donor interests: Experiences from local NGOs in the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, Bangladesh," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 21(C).
    14. Bali Swain, Ranjula, 2009. "The Impact of Skill Development and Human Capital Training on Self Help Groups," Working Paper Series 2009:11, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    15. Mathilde Maîtrot & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2017. "Poverty and wellbeing impacts of microfinance: What do we know?," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-190, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    16. Toshio Kondo & Aniceto Orbeta Jr. & Clarence Dingcong & Christine Infantado, 2008. "Impact of Microfinance on Rural Households in the Philippines," Development Economics Working Papers 22639, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    17. Chliova, Myrto & Brinckmann, Jan & Rosenbusch, Nina, 2015. "Is microcredit a blessing for the poor? A meta-analysis examining development outcomes and contextual considerations," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 467-487.
    18. Thorsten Beck, 2009. "The Econometrics of Finance and Growth," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Terence C. Mills & Kerry Patterson (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Econometrics, chapter 25, pages 1180-1209, Palgrave Macmillan.
    19. M. G. Quibria, 2012. "Microcredit and Poverty Alleviation: Can Microcredit Close the Deal?," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2012-078, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    20. Sefa K. Awaworyi, 2014. "The Impact of Microfinance Interventions: A Meta-analysis," Monash Economics Working Papers 03-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asset creation; microfinance; impact; Self Help Groups;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:uunewp:2008_005. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/nekuuse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Ulrika Öjdeby (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/nekuuse.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.