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Inequality in mortality in Vietnam: unravel the causes

Author

Listed:
  • Granlund , David

    (Department of Economics, Umeå University)

  • Chuc , NT

    (Faculty of Public Health)

  • Phuc , HD

    (Institute of Mathematics)

  • Lindholm, Lars

    (Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine)

Abstract

The association between socioeconomic variables and mortality for 41 000 adults Vietnamese followed from January 1999 to March 2008 are estimated using Cox's proportionally hazard models. Also, we use decomposition techniques to investigate the relative importance of socioeconomic factors for explaining total inequality in age-standardized mortality risk. The results confirm previously found negative association between mortality and income and education, for both men and women. The decomposition, however, shows that these variables together explain less than one third of the inequality, suggesting that it is important to also consider other dimensions of socioeconomic status, such as occupation and marital status. Finally, estimation results for relative education variables suggest that there exist positive spillover of education, meaning that that higher education of one's neighbors or spouse might reduce ones mortality risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Granlund , David & Chuc , NT & Phuc , HD & Lindholm, Lars, 2008. "Inequality in mortality in Vietnam: unravel the causes," Umeå Economic Studies 751, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:umnees:0751
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health inequality; Socioeconomic status; Mortality risk; Decomposition; Vietnam;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General

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