IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/rbnkwp/0288.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does Trading Anonymously Enhance Liquidity?

Author

Listed:
  • Dennis, Patrick J.

    () (McIntire School of Commerce, University of Virginia)

  • Sandås, Patrik

    () (McIntire School of Commerce, University of Virginia)

Abstract

Anonymous trading is the norm in today's financial markets but there are a few exceptions. We study one such case, the OMX Nordic Exchanges (Stockholm, Helsinki, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik) that have traditionally been more transparent than most other markets. On June 2, 2008 OMX Nordic switched to making post-trade reporting anonymous for some of their markets. We exploit this quasinatural experiment to investigate the impact this change had on liquidity and trading behavior. Our difference-in-difference method reveals a modest, though statistically insignificant, 14 basis point improvement in the quoted spread under the post-trade anonymous regime. The price impact of a trade decreased by a statistically significant four basis points for seller-initiated trades and did not change for buyer-initiated trades.

Suggested Citation

  • Dennis, Patrick J. & Sandås, Patrik, 2014. "Does Trading Anonymously Enhance Liquidity?," Working Paper Series 288, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:rbnkwp:0288
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.riksbank.se/Documents/Rapporter/Working_papers/2014/rap_wp288_141015.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Comerton-Forde, Carole & Frino, Alex & Mollica, Vito, 2005. "The impact of limit order anonymity on liquidity: Evidence from Paris, Tokyo and Korea," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 57(6), pages 528-540.
    2. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-793, September.
    3. François Derrien & Ambrus Kecskés, 2013. "The Real Effects of Financial Shocks: Evidence from Exogenous Changes in Analyst Coverage," Post-Print hal-00852356, HAL.
    4. Thompson, Samuel B., 2011. "Simple formulas for standard errors that cluster by both firm and time," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 1-10, January.
    5. Thierry Foucault & Sophie Moinas & Erik Theissen, 2007. "Does Anonymity Matter in Electronic Limit Order Markets?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 20(5), pages 1707-1747, 2007 28.
    6. Grossman, Sanford J & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1980. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 393-408, June.
    7. Thu Phuong Pham, 2015. "Broker ID transparency and price impact of trades: evidence from the Korean Exchange," International Journal of Managerial Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(1), pages 117-131, February.
    8. Comerton-Forde, Carole & Putniņš, Tālis J. & Tang, Kar Mei, 2011. "Why Do Traders Choose to Trade Anonymously?," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(04), pages 1025-1049, September.
    9. Menkhoff, Lukas & Schmeling, Maik, 2010. "Trader see, trader do: How do (small) FX traders react to large counterparties' trades?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 1283-1302, November.
    10. Alexandra Hachmeister & Dirk Schiereck, 2010. "Dancing in the dark: post-trade anonymity, liquidity and informed trading," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 145-177, February.
    11. Huddart, Steven & Hughes, John S & Levine, Carolyn B, 2001. "Public Disclosure and Dissimulation of Insider Trades," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(3), pages 665-681, May.
    12. Grammig, Joachim & Schiereck, Dirk & Theissen, Erik, 2001. "Knowing me, knowing you: : Trader anonymity and informed trading in parallel markets," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 385-412, October.
    13. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    14. Alex Frino & David Johnstone & Hui Zheng, 2010. "Anonymity, Stealth Trading, and the Information Content of Broker Identity," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 45(3), pages 501-522, August.
    15. Hachmeister, A. & Schiereck, D., 2010. "Dancing in the Dark: Post-trade Anonymity, Liquidity, and Informed Trading," Publications of Darmstadt Technical University, Institute for Business Studies (BWL) 34883, Darmstadt Technical University, Department of Business Administration, Economics and Law, Institute for Business Studies (BWL).
    16. François Derrien & Ambrus Kecskés, 2013. "The Real Effects of Financial Shocks: Evidence from Exogenous Changes in Analyst Coverage," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(4), pages 1407-1440, August.
    17. Comerton-Forde, Carole & Tang, Kar Mei, 2009. "Anonymity, liquidity and fragmentation," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 337-367, August.
    18. Kyle, Albert S, 1985. "Continuous Auctions and Insider Trading," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 53(6), pages 1315-1335, November.
    19. Barbara Rindi, 2008. "Informed Traders as Liquidity Providers: Anonymity, Liquidity and Price Formation," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 12(3), pages 497-532.
    20. Yusif Simaan & Daniel G. Weaver & David K. Whitcomb, 2003. "Market Maker Quotation Behavior and Pretrade Transparency," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 58(3), pages 1247-1268, June.
    21. Fishman, Michael J & Hagerty, Kathleen M, 1995. "The Mandatory Disclosure of Trades and Market Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 8(3), pages 637-676.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Anonymity; Transparency; Liquidity; Broker ID;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:rbnkwp:0288. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lena Löfgren). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/rbgovse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.