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Estimates of the Inflation Effect of a Global Carbon Price on Consumer, Investment, Export, and Import Prices

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Abstract

This paper considers the potential inflation effects of a global carbon price on consumer prices, investment prices, export prices, and import prices. We estimate the effects under three different scenarios. The results clearly indicate that the inflation effects in developed countries of a 100 USD/ton carbon price are small. For developing countries, the inflation effect is larger and potentially too large for it to be politically feasible to introduce a global carbon price. However, a simple adjustment of the price based on the price level in each country equalizes the inflation effects across all countries, whereby a global carbon price is more likely to be implemented.

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  • Andersson, Fredrik N.G., 2018. "Estimates of the Inflation Effect of a Global Carbon Price on Consumer, Investment, Export, and Import Prices," Working Papers 2018:22, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lunewp:2018_022
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    carbon price; inflation; consumer prices; export prices; imports prices; investment prices; monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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