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Understanding Cluster Evolution

Author

Listed:
  • Trippl , Michaela

    () (CIRCLE, Lund University)

  • Grillitsch , Markus

    () (CIRCLE, Lund University)

  • Isaksen , Arne

    () (Department of Working Life and Innovation, University of Agder, Norway)

  • Sinozic , Tanja

    () (Institute for Multi-Level Governance and Development, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria)

Abstract

The past few years have seen an increasing popularity of cluster life cycle approaches. These models, however, suggest a rather deterministic view, are indifferent with respect to context and suffer from biological connotations. This chapter intends to go beyond the cluster life cycle models. We review the literature on industrial districts, innovative milieu and regional innovation systems and investigate how these alternative approaches contribute to the development of a more context-sensitive approach to cluster change. We argue that future research may benefit from developing theoretically relevant categorizations of different cluster types and from carrying out comparative empirical studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Trippl , Michaela & Grillitsch , Markus & Isaksen , Arne & Sinozic , Tanja, 2015. "Understanding Cluster Evolution," Papers in Innovation Studies 2015/46, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lucirc:2015_046
    as

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    File URL: http://wp.circle.lu.se/upload/CIRCLE/workingpapers/201546_Trippl_et_al.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    2. Jensen, Morten Berg & Johnson, Bjorn & Lorenz, Edward & Lundvall, Bengt Ake, 2007. "Forms of knowledge and modes of innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 680-693, June.
    3. Max-Peter Menzel & Dirk Fornahl, 2010. "Cluster life cycles--dimensions and rationales of cluster evolution," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 205-238, February.
    4. Koen Frenken & Frank Van Oort & Thijs Verburg, 2007. "Related Variety, Unrelated Variety and Regional Economic Growth," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(5), pages 685-697.
    5. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2011. "Conceptualizing Cluster Evolution: Beyond the Life Cycle Model?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 1299-1318.
    6. James Simmie, 2012. "Path Dependence and New Path Creation in Renewable Energy Technologies," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(5), pages 729-731, May.
    7. Klepper, Steven, 1997. "Industry Life Cycles," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 145-181.
    8. Michaela Trippl & Markus Grillitsch & Arne Isaksen & Tanja Sinozic, 2015. "Perspectives on Cluster Evolution: Critical Review and Future Research Issues," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(10), pages 2028-2044, October.
    9. Edward M. Bergman, 2007. "Cluster Life-Cycles: An Emerging Synthesis," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2007_04, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
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    14. Martin Srholec & Bart Verspagen, 2012. "The Voyage of the Beagle into innovation: explorations on heterogeneity, selection, and sectors," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(5), pages 1221-1253, October.
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    16. Arne Isaksen & James Karlsen, 2012. "What Is Regional in Regional Clusters? The Case of the Globally Oriented Oil and Gas Cluster in Agder, Norway," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 249-263, April.
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    18. Todtling, Franz & Trippl, Michaela, 2005. "One size fits all?: Towards a differentiated regional innovation policy approach," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1203-1219, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cluster evolution; cluster life cycle; regional industrial change; regional innovation systems;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • R50 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - General

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