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Is China Different? A Meta Analysis Of The Effect Of Foreign Direct Investment On Domestic Firms

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Empirical evidence suggests that China has benefited from foreign direct investment (FDI). However, an important question that remains unanswered is whether China has benefited more from FDI than other countries in general and other transition and developing countries in particular. This paper investigates this issue by performing a Meta-analysis on a sample of 67 country-specific studies yielding 125 observations that have gauged the nexus between FDI and measures of income growth. The results show that studies on China report relatively high t-values and thus indicate that China may have benefited more than other countries from FDI.

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  • Ljungwall, Christer & Gustavsson Tingvall, Patrik, 2008. "Is China Different? A Meta Analysis Of The Effect Of Foreign Direct Investment On Domestic Firms," Working Paper Series 2008-2, Stockholm School of Economics, China Economic Research Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:hacerc:2008-002
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    1. Abdul Khaliq & Ilan Noy, 2007. "Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth: Empirical Evidence from Sectoral Data in Indonesia," Working Papers 200726, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
    2. Jozef Konings, 1999. "The Effect of Direct Foreign Investment on Domestic Firms: Evidence from Firm Level Panel Data in Emerging Economies," LICOS Discussion Papers 8699, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    3. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
    4. Mookerjee, Rajen, 2006. "A meta-analysis of the export growth hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(3), pages 395-401, June.
    5. Ashenfelter, Orley & Harmon, Colm & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1999. "A review of estimates of the schooling/earnings relationship, with tests for publication bias," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 453-470, November.
    6. Gorg, Holger & Strobl, Eric, 2001. "Multinational Companies and Productivity Spillovers: A Meta-analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(475), pages 723-739, November.
    7. Phillips, Joseph M, 1994. "Farmer Education and Farmer Efficiency: A Meta-Analysis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 149-165, October.
    8. Rossitza B. Wooster & David S. Diebel, 2010. "Productivity Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 640-655, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kokko, Ari & Tingvall, Patrik Gustavsson & Videnord, Josefin, 2015. "The growth effects of R&D spending in the EU: A meta-analysis," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-26.
    2. Gunby, Philip & Jin, Yinghua & Robert Reed, W., 2017. "Did FDI Really Cause Chinese Economic Growth? A Meta-Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 242-255.
    3. Ljungwall, Christer & Tingvall, Patrik Gustavsson, 2015. "Is China different? A meta-analysis of the growth-enhancing effect from R&D spending in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 272-278.
    4. Tingvall, Patrik Gustavsson & Ljungwall, Christer, 2012. "Is China different? A meta-analysis of export-led growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 177-179.
    5. Taotao Chen & Ari Kokko & Patrik Gustavsson Tingvall, 2011. "FDI and spillovers in China: non-linearity and absorptive capacity," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 1-22.
    6. Christer Ljungwall & Patrik Gustavsson Tingvall, 2013. "Is China different? A meta-analysis of China's financial sector development," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(7), pages 715-718, May.
    7. Ljungwall, Christer & Gustavsson Tingvall, Patrik, 2014. "No. 233 Is China Different? A Meta-Analysis of the Growth-enhancing Effect from R&D Spending in China," Ratio Working Papers 233, The Ratio Institute.

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    Keywords

    Meta-analysis; Foreign direct investment; Economic growth; China;

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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