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Is China Different? A Meta Analysis Of The Effect Of Foreign Direct Investment On Domestic Firms

Empirical evidence suggests that China has benefited from foreign direct investment (FDI). However, an important question that remains unanswered is whether China has benefited more from FDI than other countries in general and other transition and developing countries in particular. This paper investigates this issue by performing a Meta-analysis on a sample of 67 country-specific studies yielding 125 observations that have gauged the nexus between FDI and measures of income growth. The results show that studies on China report relatively high t-values and thus indicate that China may have benefited more than other countries from FDI.

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Paper provided by China Economic Research Center, Stockholm School of Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number 2008-2.

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Length: 13 pages
Date of creation: 01 Nov 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:hacerc:2008-002
Contact details of provider: Postal: China Economic Research Center, Stockholm School of Economics, P.O. Box 6501, 113 83 Stockholm, Sweden
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  1. Ashenfelter, O. & Harmon, C. & Oosterbeek, H., 1999. "A Review of Estimates of the Schooling/ Earnings Relationship, with tests for Publication Bias," Papers 99/20, College Dublin, Department of Political Economy-.
  2. Jozef Konings, 1999. "The Effect of Direct Foreign Investment on Domestic Firms: Evidence from Firm Level Panel Data in Emerging Economies," LICOS Discussion Papers 8699, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  3. Phillips, Joseph M, 1994. "Farmer Education and Farmer Efficiency: A Meta-Analysis," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 43(1), pages 149-65, October.
  4. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
  5. Mookerjee, Rajen, 2006. "A meta-analysis of the export growth hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(3), pages 395-401, June.
  6. Gorg, Holger & Strobl, Eric, 2001. "Multinational Companies and Productivity Spillovers: A Meta-analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(475), pages F723-39, November.
  7. Rossitza B. Wooster & David S. Diebel, 2010. "Productivity Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 640-655, 08.
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