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Wrestling with Japanese Tribalism Emerging Collaborative Opportunities For India and Japan




Japanese firms, with their strong technology base and high domestic factor costs, have the potential of teaming with India, with its more basic infrastructure and eight times the population. Japan's poorly-performing excess capital could fuel India's strongly-developing middle class and robust entrepreneurialism. Especially promising are collaborative information technology projects. What stands in the way of a greatly expanded relationship? Much of the blockage stems from Japan's insularism, an impetus here labeled tribalism. A hopeful dimension is that this tribalism can be clearly defined as archaic, recognized as detrimental, and then toned-down. Further points for development include an active campaign to encourage diversity in Japan, teaming up to provide alternatives to investment in neighboring China, and agitating for representation on the UN Security Council. India can help initiate all these processes, and can in turn benefit from a Japan reaching out for regional economic partnerships.

Suggested Citation

  • Lambert, Bruce Henry, 2002. "Wrestling with Japanese Tribalism Emerging Collaborative Opportunities For India and Japan," EIJS Working Paper Series 143, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0143

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Patibandla, Murali & Petersen, Bent, 2002. "Role of Transnational Corporations in the Evolution of a High-Tech Industry: The Case of India's Software Industry," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 1561-1577, September.
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    More about this item


    homogeneity; tribalism; UN Security Council; partnership; immigration; trade; e-Japan strategy;

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • L86 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Information and Internet Services; Computer Software
    • N45 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation - - - Asia including Middle East
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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