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The influence of individuals’ environmental attitudes and urban design features on their travel patterns in sustainable neighborhoods in the UK

  • Susilo, Yusak O.

    ()

    (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH))

  • Williams, Katie

    (University of the West of England (UWE))

  • Lindsay, Morag

    (Oxford Brookes University)

  • Dair, Carol

    (Oxford Brookes University)

Registered author(s):

    This paper explores the influence of individuals’ environmental attitudes and urban design features on travel behavior, including mode choice. It uses data from residents of 13 new neighborhood UK developments designed to support sustainable travel. It is found that almost all respondents were concerned about environmental issues, but their views did not necessarily ‘match’ their travel behavior. Individuals’ environmental concerns only had a strong relationship with walking within and near their neighborhood, but not with cycling or public transport use. Residents’ car availability reduced public transport trips, walking and cycling. The influence of urban design features on travel behaviors was mixed, higher incidences of walking in denser, mixed and more permeable developments were not found and nor did residents own fewer cars than the population as a whole. Residents did, however, make more sustainable commuting trips than the population in general. Sustainable modes of travel were related to urban design features including secured bike storage, high connectivity of the neighborhoods to the nearby area, natural surveillance, high quality public realm and traffic calming. Likewise the provision of facilities within and nearby the development encouraged high levels of walking.

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    File URL: http://www.transportportal.se/SWoPEc/CTS2012-1.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI) in its series Working papers in Transport Economics with number 2012:1.

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    Length: 13 pages
    Date of creation: 02 Feb 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2012_001
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Centrum för Transportstudier (CTS), Teknikringen 10, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
    Web page: http://www.cts.kth.se/

    References listed on IDEAS
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    1. Susan Handy & Kelly Clifton, 2001. "Local shopping as a strategy for reducing automobile travel," Transportation, Springer, vol. 28(4), pages 317-346, November.
    2. Handy, Susan & Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "Correlation or causality between the built environment and travel behavior? Evidence from Northern California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5b76c5kg, University of California Transportation Center.
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