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Who does the shopping? German time-use evidence, 1996-2009

Author

Listed:
  • Vivien Procher

    () (Schumpeter School of Business and Economics, University of Wuppertal)

  • Colin Vance

    () (RWI, Hohenzollernstraße 1-3, 45128 Essen)

Abstract

The labor force participation rate of women and men is converging in industrialized countries, but disparities nevertheless remain with respect to unpaid activities. Shopping for household maintenance, in particular, is a time-consuming, out-of-home activity that continues to be undertaken primarily by women, irrespective of their employment status. The present study employs panel methods to analyze, descriptively and econometrically, gender disparities in shopping behavior among couples using data from the German Mobility Panel (MOP) for 1996 to 2009. While women still shop more than men, we find evidence that the differential has narrowed in recent years, particularly among couples with children. Several individual and household characteristics are found to be significant determinants of shopping behavior, whereby employment status and children emerge as the most important single factors. In addition, the possession of a driver’s license coupled with unrestricted car availability increase each partner’s time in shopping.

Suggested Citation

  • Vivien Procher & Colin Vance, 2013. "Who does the shopping? German time-use evidence, 1996-2009," Schumpeter Discussion Papers SDP13001, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwu:schdps:sdp13001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Weinrich, Ramona & Franz, Annabell & Spiller, Achim, 2015. "Multi-level labelling: too complex for consumers?," 143rd Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, March 25-27, 2015, Naples, Italy 202752, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Weinrich, Ramona & Franz, Annabell & Spiller, Achim, 2015. "Multi-level labelling: Too complex for consumers?," DARE Discussion Papers 1512, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development (DARE).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Shopping; Time-use; gender differences;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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