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Unemployment in European Regions: Structural Problems vs. the Eurozone Hypothesis

Author

Listed:
  • Andersson, Åke E.

    () (Jönköping International Business School)

  • Andersson , David Emanuel

    () (Nottingham University Business School China)

  • Hårsman, Björn

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)

  • Daghbashyan, Zara

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)

Abstract

Unemployment rates differ dramatically across European regions. This paper analyses these differences by integrating institutional and spatial perspectives into a unified theoretical framework. An econometric model is then used to analyse differences among European NUTS2 regions. The results of random-effects models indicate that there are four key factors that explain regional unemployment rates. Flexible labour market regulations and above-average levels of interpersonal trust are institutional factors that reduce unemployment. Accessibility factors such as inter-regional transport connectivity and local access to skilled workers have similarly substantial effects. Whether a region belongs to the Eurozone or not seems to be less important.

Suggested Citation

  • Andersson, Åke E. & Andersson , David Emanuel & Hårsman, Björn & Daghbashyan, Zara, 2014. "Unemployment in European Regions: Structural Problems vs. the Eurozone Hypothesis," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 355, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0355
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fujita,Masahisa, 1991. "Urban Economic Theory," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521396455, March.
    2. Guido Tabellini, 2010. "Culture and Institutions: Economic Development in the Regions of Europe," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 677-716, June.
    3. Nicola Gennaioli & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2013. "Human Capital and Regional Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(1), pages 105-164.
    4. Edmund S. Phelps, 2008. "Macroeconomics for a Modern Economy," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 52(1), pages 3-22, March.
    5. Lee, Jim, 2000. "The Robustness of Okun's Law: Evidence from OECD Countries," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 331-356, April.
    6. Börje Johansson & Johan Klaesson & Michael Olsson, 2002. "Time distances and labor market integration," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 81(3), pages 305-327.
    7. Rauch James E., 1993. "Productivity Gains from Geographic Concentration of Human Capital: Evidence from the Cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 380-400, November.
    8. Ian R. Gordon & Paul C. Cheshire, 1998. "original: Territorial competition: Some lessons for policy," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 32(3), pages 321-346.
    9. Laurence M. Ball & Daniel Leigh & Prakash Loungani, 2013. "Okun's Law: Fit at Fifty?," NBER Working Papers 18668, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; Euro; institutions; accessibility;

    JEL classification:

    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R28 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Government Policy

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