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The Value of Network Information: Assortative Mixing Makes the Difference

Author

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  • Mohamed Belhaj

    (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Frédéric Deroïan

    (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

We study the value of network information in a context of monopoly pricing in the presence of local network externalities. We compare a setting in which all players, i.e. the monopoly and consumers, know the network structure and consumers' private preferences with a setting in which players only know the joint distribution of preferences, in-degrees and out-degrees. We give conditions under which network information increases profit or/and consumer surplus. The analysis reveals the crucial role played by four properties: degree assortativity, homophily (in preferences), preference-degree assortativity and preference-Bonacich centrality assortativity.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohamed Belhaj & Frédéric Deroïan, 2016. "The Value of Network Information: Assortative Mixing Makes the Difference," Working Papers halshs-01314954, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01314954
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01314954
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Panebianco, Fabrizio & Verdier, Thierry & Zenou, Yves, 2016. "Innovation, Pricing and Targeting in Networks," CEPR Discussion Papers 11398, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Chen, Ying-Ju & Zenou, Yves & Zhou, Junjie, 2020. "Network Topology and Market Structure," CEPR Discussion Papers 14495, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    degree assortativity; network information; monopoly; network effects; price discrimination; Bonacich centrality; homophily; preference-degree assortativity; preference-Bonacich centrality assortativity;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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