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Fiscal Shocks in a Two-Sector Open Economy with Endogenous Markups

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  • Olivier Cardi

    (LEO - Laboratoire d'économie d'Orleans - UO - Université d'Orléans - Université de Tours - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Tours)

  • Romain Restout

    (UCL - Université Catholique de Louvain, BETA - Bureau d'Économie Théorique et Appliquée - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - UNISTRA - Université de Strasbourg - UL - Université de Lorraine - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

We use a two-sector neoclassical open economy model with traded and non-traded goods and endogenous markups to investigate the effects of temporary fiscal shocks. One central finding is that theory can be reconciled with evidence once we allow for endogenous markups and assume that the traded sector is more capital intensive than the non-traded sector. More precisely, while both ingredients are essential to produce the real exchange rate depreciation, only the second ingredient is necessary to account for the simultaneous decline in investment and the current account, in line with the evidence.

Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Cardi & Romain Restout, 2015. "Fiscal Shocks in a Two-Sector Open Economy with Endogenous Markups," Working Papers halshs-01252524, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01252524
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01252524
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Glick, Reuven & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Global versus country-specific productivity shocks and the current account," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 159-192, February.
    2. Meixing Dai, 2016. "Static And Dynamic Effects Of Central Bank Transparency," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(1), pages 55-78, January.
    3. Claudia Curi & Cinzia Daraio & Patrick Llerena, 2012. "University technology transfer: how (in)efficient are French universities?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(3), pages 629-654.
    4. Julien Pénin, 2012. "Motivation crowding-out: Is there a risk for science?," Working Papers of BETA 2012-13, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    5. Jaimovich, Nir & Floetotto, Max, 2008. "Firm dynamics, markup variations, and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1238-1252, October.
    6. Olivier Cardi & Romain Restout, 2014. "Unanticipated vs. Anticipated Tax Reforms in a Two-Sector Open Economy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 25(2), pages 373-406, April.
    7. Yang, Xiaokai & Heijdra, Ben J, 1993. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 295-301, March.
    8. Schubert, Stefan F & Turnovsky, Stephen J, 2002. "The Dynamics of Temporary Policies in a Small Open Economy," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(4), pages 604-622, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Olivier Cardi & Peter Claeys & Romain Restout, 2016. "Imperfect Mobility Of Labor Across Sectors And Fiscal Transmission," Working Papers of BETA 2016-39, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    2. Anthony J. Makin, 2013. "The policy (in)effectiveness of government spending in a dependent economy," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 287-301, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Non-traded Goods; Fiscal Shocks; Investment; Current Account; Endogenous markup.;

    JEL classification:

    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements

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