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The Effect of the Arab Spring on the Preferences for Redistribution in Egypt

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  • Bilal El Rafhi

    (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - FRE2010 - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UM - Université de Montpellier)

  • Alexandre Volle

    (CEE-M - Centre d'Economie de l'Environnement - Montpellier - FRE2010 - Montpellier SupAgro - Institut national d’études supérieures agronomiques de Montpellier - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UM - Université de Montpellier)

Abstract

The present paper investigates the effect of the revolution occurred in January 2011 in Egypt on the Preferences of Redistribution. This shock has been an important event enhancing the freedom situation and political structure. In a first step taking into account the main determinants explaining Preferences of Redistribution displayed in literature, our results differ showing a positive impact of the religion and a negative impact of the altruistic attitude. In a second step, we rely on a diff-in-diff approach to estimate the effect of the revolution using as control group three similar countries. We find that Egyptians became much more favorable to redistribution after the Arab Spring. Moreover, the revolution effect is stronger for the poorest people and those who are interested in politics.

Suggested Citation

  • Bilal El Rafhi & Alexandre Volle, 2019. "The Effect of the Arab Spring on the Preferences for Redistribution in Egypt," Post-Print hal-02101392, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-02101392
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02101392
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Revolution political rivalries; political situation; Redistributive preferences; Revolution; Arab spring; Freedom; Political situ- ation;
    All these keywords.

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