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Family size, Increasing block tariff and Economies of scale of household electricity consumption in Vietnam from 2010 to 2014

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  • Hoai-Son Nguyen

    () (CIRED - Centre international de recherche sur l'environnement et le développement - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - AgroParisTech - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CleanED - Clean Energy and Sustainable Development Lab - USTH - University of sciences and technologies of hanoi, ABIES Doctoral School)

  • Minh Ha-Duong

    () (CIRED - Centre international de recherche sur l'environnement et le développement - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - AgroParisTech - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CleanED - Clean Energy and Sustainable Development Lab - USTH - University of sciences and technologies of hanoi)

Abstract

Household electricity consumption potentially offers economies of scale, since lighting, cooling or cooking can be shared among household members. This idea needs to be tested empirically. Under an increasing block tariff schedule the marginal and average price of electricity increases with total consumption. Does this effect offset economies of scale in the larger families? This paper uses data from Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey (VHLSS) in 2010, 2012 and 2014 to investigate whether there are economies of scale for Vietnam household electricity consumption in that period. The data will be tested formally by an OLS model and checked robustness by visualization of local linear regressions. Estimated results and robustness check confirm that in general, economies of scale do exist for household electricity consumption in Vietnam from 2010-2014.

Suggested Citation

  • Hoai-Son Nguyen & Minh Ha-Duong, 2017. "Family size, Increasing block tariff and Economies of scale of household electricity consumption in Vietnam from 2010 to 2014," Post-Print hal-01714899, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01714899
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01714899
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alberini, Anna & Gans, Will & Velez-Lopez, Daniel, 2011. "Residential Consumption of Gas and Electricity in the U.S.: The Role of Prices and Income," Sustainable Development Papers 99637, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
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    Keywords

    household economies of scale; electricity use; increasing block tariffs;

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