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A Comparative Study of Subjective Well-Being Among Working Mothers in Indonesia and China

Author

Listed:
  • Resnia Novitasari

    (Department of Psychology, Universitas Islam Indonesia Author-2-Name: Hazhira Qudsyi Author-2-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology, Universitas Islam Indonesia Author-3-Name: Tika Pratiwi Ambarito Author-3-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology, Universitas Islam Indonesia Author-4-Name: Eri Yudhani Author-4-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology, Universitas Islam Indonesia Author-5-Name: Fakhrunnisak Author-5-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology, Universitas Islam Indonesia Author-6-Name: Chenxi Wang Author-6-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, China Author-7-Name: Mingming Liu Author-7-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, China Author-8-Name: Baihua Chen Author-8-Workplace-Name: Department of Psychology and Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang University, China)

Abstract

Objective – This study investigates cross-cultural differences in subjective well-being among working mothers in Indonesia and China, as members of the big five countries with high density populations in the world. Methodology/Technique – The participants in this study include 168 working mothers, of which 118 are Indonesian and 50 are Chinese. The subjective well-being variable was measured using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and The Scale of Positive and Negative Experiences (SPANE). This study also uses an independent sample t-test to examine the difference between the two. Findings – The results show that t (116) = 2.779, p = 0.006, which indicates that there are different conditions between working mothers in Indonesia and China that affect subjective well-being.

Suggested Citation

  • Resnia Novitasari, 2018. "A Comparative Study of Subjective Well-Being Among Working Mothers in Indonesia and China," GATR Journals gjbssr507, Global Academy of Training and Research (GATR) Enterprise.
  • Handle: RePEc:gtr:gatrjs:gjbssr507
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bert Hofman & Min Zhao & Yoichiro Ishihara, 2007. "Asian Development Strategies: China And Indonesia Compared," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 171-200.
    2. Appleton, Simon & Song, Lina, 2008. "Life Satisfaction in Urban China: Components and Determinants," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2325-2340, November.
    3. Shimazu, Akihito & Demerouti, Evangelia & Bakker, Arnold B. & Shimada, Kyoko & Kawakami, Norito, 2011. "Workaholism and well-being among Japanese dual-earner couples: A spillover-crossover perspective," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(3), pages 399-409, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; Indonesia; Comparative Study; Subjective Well-Being; Working Mothers.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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