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Why gender based game theory?

Author

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  • Pablo Brañas-Garza

    () (Department of Economic Theory and Economic History, University of Granada.)

Abstract

The behavior of men and women in a number of games free of social issues is explored. The analysis is conducted for simple (2x2) and complex (guessing) games and in static and repeated settings. No gender effect is observed either in static nor in repeated games. It is concluded that gender bias vanishes in the absence of social issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Pablo Brañas-Garza, 2006. "Why gender based game theory?," ThE Papers 06/08, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  • Handle: RePEc:gra:wpaper:06/08
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ugr.es/~teoriahe/RePEc/gra/wpaper/thepapers06_08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fernando Aguiar & Pablo Brañas-Garza & Ramón Cobo-Reyes & Natalia Jimenez & Luis Miller, 2009. "Are women expected to be more generous?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 12(1), pages 93-98, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender bias; dominated strategies; Nash equilibrium; learning.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games

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