IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/gmf/wpaper/2013-10..html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Productivity Growth and Convergence: Portugal in the EU 1986-2009

Author

Listed:
  • Adelaide Duarte

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra and GEMF, Portugal)

  • Marta Simões

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra and GEMF, Portugal)

  • João Sousa Andrade

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra and GEMF, Portugal)

Abstract

The Portuguese growth and convergence experience after EU membership can be divided into two periods: 1986-1998, a convergence period during which growth in the Portuguese economy accelerated and Portugal grew faster than the EU14 average; and a stagnation/divergence period from 1999 onwards when its growth rate slowed down to figures lower than the reference group average. Differences among developed countries in terms of output levels and growth are mainly explained by differences in productivity, with Portugal falling behind relative to the EU14 in recent years as far as the former are concerned. In order to better understand the causes for the changes in the growth and convergence rhythm of the Portuguese economy after EU accession this paper analyses productivity growth in a panel of 14 European Union countries over the period 1986-2009. We estimate an empirical model where innovation and imitation provide two potential sources of productivity growth for countries behind the technological frontier, as is the case of Portugal, and those activities are in turn influenced by absorptive capacity and structural and institutional characteristics as well as capital accumulation. The results from the estimation of TFP growth regressions with quantile regression techniques reveal that, for lower rates of productivity growth, an increase of the non-tradables sector share is especially harmful, while the positive influence from technological backwardness and innovation activities are felt less strongly, while the positive influence from capital accumulation is felt more strongly. These results raise strong concerns concerning Portugal’s future growth prospects given its current specialization pattern towards traditional personal services and the country’s still considerable distance from the technological frontier and relatively low innovative intensity.

Suggested Citation

  • Adelaide Duarte & Marta Simões & João Sousa Andrade, 2013. "Productivity Growth and Convergence: Portugal in the EU 1986-2009," GEMF Working Papers 2013-10, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
  • Handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2013-10.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://gemf.fe.uc.pt/workingpapers/pdf/2013/gemf_2013-10.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jesus regstdpo-Cuaresma & Neil Foster & Robert Stehrer, 2011. "Determinants of Regional Economic Growth by Quantile," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(6), pages 809-826.
    2. Lains, Pedro & Santos Pereira, Álvaro, 2010. "From an agrarian society to a knowledge economy : Portugal, 1950-2010," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp10-09, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    productivity growth; innovation; imitation; Portugal; EU.;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2013-10.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ana Seiça). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cebucpt.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.