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Implications of bulk water transfer on local water management institutions: A case study of the Melamchi Water Supply Project in Nepal

  • Pant, Dhruba
  • Bhattarai, Madhusudan
  • Basnet, Govinda
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    "To mitigate a drinking water crisis in Kathmandu valley, the Government of Nepal initiated the Melamchi Water Supply Project in 1997, which will divert water from the Melamchi River to Kathmandu city's water supply network. In the first phase, the Project will divert 170,000 cubic meters of water per day (at the rate of 1.97M3/sec), which will be tripled using the same infrastructure as city water demand increases in the future. The large scale transfer of water would have farreaching implications in both water supplying and receiving basins. This paper analyzes some of the major changes related to local water management and socioeconomics brought about by the Project and in particular the changes in the local water management institutions in the Melamchi basin. Our study shows that traditional informal water management institutions were effective in regulating present water use practices in the water supplying basin, but the situation will vastly change because of the scale of water transfer, and power inequity between the organized public sector on one side and dispersed and unorganized marginal water users on the other. The small scale of water usage and multiple informal arrangements at the local level have made it difficult for the local users and institutions to collectively bargain and negotiate with the central water transfer authority for a fair share of project benefits and compensation for the losses imposed on them. The process and scale of project compensation for economic losses and equity over resource use are at the heart of the concerns and debates about the Melamchi water transfer decision. The Project has planned for a one-time compensation package of about US$18 million for development infrastructure related investments and is planning to share about one percent of revenue generated from water use in the city with the supplying basin. The main issues here are what forms of water sharing governance, compensation packages, and water rights structures would emerge in relation to the project implementation and whether they are socially acceptable ensuring equitable distribution of the project benefits to all basin communities. In addition, these issues of the Melamchi project discussed in this paper are equally pertinent to other places where rural to urban water transfer projects are under discussion." authors' abstract

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    Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series CAPRi working papers with number 78.

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    Date of creation: 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:fpr:worpps:78
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    1. Yoder, Robert, 1994. "Locally managed irrigation systems: essential tasks and implications for assistance, management transfer and turnover programs," IWMI Books, International Water Management Institute, number 114044.
    2. Booker, James F. & Taylor, R. Garth & Young, Robert A., 1998. "Optimal Temporal And Spatial Scheduling Of Arid-Region Water Supply Projects With Nonrenewable Groundwater Stocks," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20790, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Pradhan, R. & von Benda-Beckmann, F & von Benda-Beckmann, K. & Spiertz, H. L. J. & Khadka, S. S. & Haq, K. A., 1997. "Water rights, conflict and policy: Proceedings of a workshop held in Kathmandu, Nepal, January 22-24, 1996," IWMI Books, Reports H020123, International Water Management Institute.
    4. Yoder, R., 1994. "Locally managed irrigation systems: Essential tasks and implications for assistance, management transfer and turnover programs," IWMI Books, Reports H011888, International Water Management Institute.
    5. Knox, Anna & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Hazell, P. B. R., 1998. "Property rights, collective action and technologies for natural resource management: a conceptual framework," CAPRi working papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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