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Soil degradation: a threat to developing-country food security by 2020?

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  • Scherr, Sara J.

Abstract

Global population in the year 2020 will be a third higher than in 1995, but demand for food and fiber will rise by an even higher proportion, as incomes grow, diets diversify, and urbanization accelerates. However this demand is met, population and farming pressure on land resources will intensify greatly. There is growing concern in some quarters that a decline in long-term soil productivity is already seriously limiting food production in the developing world, and that the problem is getting worse. Sarah Sherr first focuses on the magnitude and effects of soil degradation. She then addresses soil degradation in the future and ends her brief with policy and research priorities.

Suggested Citation

  • Scherr, Sara J., 1999. "Soil degradation: a threat to developing-country food security by 2020?," 2020 vision briefs 58, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:2020br:58
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/publication/soil-degradation-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Joachim von Braun, 2005. "Agricultural economics and distributional effects," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(s1), pages 1-20, January.
    2. Leisinger, Klaus M., 2000. "The 'Political Economy' of Agricultural Biotechnology for the Developing World," 2000 Conference, August 13-18, 2000, Berlin, Germany 197190, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Hurni, H. & Osman-Elasha, B. & Barnett, A. & Herbert, A. & Idel, A. & Kairo, M. & Pascual-Gapasin, D. & Schneider, J. & Wiebe, K. & Cisse, G. & Clark, N. & de la Fuente, M. & Debele, B. & Giger, M. & , 2009. "Context, conceptual framework and sustainability indicators," IWMI Books, Reports H042790, International Water Management Institute.
    4. Ashwini Chhatre & Sripad Devalkar & Sridhar Seshadri, 2016. "Crop diversification and risk management in Indian agriculture," DECISION: Official Journal of the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Springer;Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, vol. 43(2), pages 167-179, June.
    5. Ranjan, Ram, 2014. "Linking common property resource management to human capital outcomes," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 139-153.
    6. Alice Pell, 1999. "Integrated Crop–livestock Management Systems in Sub-saharan Africa," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 337-348, September.
    7. Headey, Derek D. & Jayne, T.S., 2014. "Adaptation to land constraints: Is Africa different?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 18-33.
    8. Ramasamy, C., 2004. "Constraints to Growth in Indian Agriculture: Needed Technology, Resource Management and Trade Strategies," Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Indian Society of Agricultural Economics, vol. 59(1).
    9. Obare, Gideon A. & Mwakubo, Samuel M. & Ouma, Emily Awuor & Mohammed, Lutta & Omiti, John M., 2004. "Social Capital and Soil Erosion Control in Agriculturally Marginal Areas of Kenya: The Case of Machakos and Taita-Taveta Districts," 2004 Inaugural Symposium, December 6-8, 2004, Nairobi, Kenya 9532, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    10. Rosen, Stacey L. & Wiebe, Keith D., 2001. "Resource Quality, Agricultural Productivity, And Food Security," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20737, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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