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Optimality of the Friedman rule in an overlapping generations model with spatial separation

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  • Joseph H. Haslag
  • Antoine Martin

Abstract

We examine models with spatial separation and limited communication that have shown some promise toward resolving the disparity between theory and practice concerning optimal monetary policy; these models suggest that the Friedman rule may not be optimal. We show that intergenerational transfers play a key role in this result, the Friedman rule is a necessary condition for an efficient allocation in equilibrium, and the Friedman rule is chosen whenever agents can implement mutually beneficial arrangements. We conclude that in order for these models to resolve the aforementioned disparity, they must answer the following question: Where do the frictions that prevent agents from implementing mutually beneficial arrangements come from?

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph H. Haslag & Antoine Martin, 2005. "Optimality of the Friedman rule in an overlapping generations model with spatial separation," Staff Reports 225, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:225
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Valerie R. Bencivenga & Bruce D. Smith, 1991. "Financial Intermediation and Endogenous Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 195-209.
    2. Beatrix Paal & Bruce D. Smith, 2013. "The sub-optimality of the Friedman rule and the optimum quantity of money," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(2), pages 911-948, November.
    3. Freeman, Scott, 1993. "Resolving Differences over the Optimal Quantity of Money," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(4), pages 801-811, November.
    4. Chari, V. V. & Christiano, Lawrence J. & Kehoe, Patrick J., 1996. "Optimality of the Friedman rule in economies with distorting taxes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 203-223, April.
    5. Joydeep Bhattacharya & Joseph H. Haslag & Antoine Martin, 2005. "Heterogeneity, Redistribution, And The Friedman Rule," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 437-454, May.
    6. Kimbrough, Kent P., 1986. "The optimum quantity of money rule in the theory of public finance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 277-284, November.
    7. Antinolfi, Gaetano & Keister, Todd, 2006. "Discount Window Policy, Banking Crises, And Indeterminacy Of Equilibrium," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(01), pages 1-19, February.
    8. Correia, Isabel & Teles, Pedro, 1996. "Is the Friedman rule optimal when money is an intermediate good?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 223-244, October.
    9. Joseph H. Haslag & Joydeep Bhattacharya & Antoine Martin, 2004. "Sub-Optimality of the Friedman Rule in Townsends Turnpike and Limited Communication Models of money: Do finite lives and initial dates matter?," Working Papers 0415, Department of Economics, University of Missouri, revised 21 Dec 2004.
    10. Stacey Schreft & Bruce Smith, 2008. "The social value of risk-free government debt," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 131-155, March.
    11. Joydeep Bhattacharya & Mark G. Guzman & Elisabeth Huybens & Bruce D. Smith, 1995. "Monetary, Fiscal, and Bank Regulatory Policy in a Simple Monetary Growth Model," Working Papers 9501, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
    12. Schreft, Stacey L & Smith, Bruce D, 2002. "The Conduct of Monetary Policy with a Shrinking Stock of Government Debt," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(3), pages 848-882, August.
    13. Bruce D. Smith, 2002. "Monetary Policy, Banking Crises, and the Friedman Rule," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 128-134, May.
    14. Bruce D. Smith, 2003. "Taking intermediation seriously," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1319-1377.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eisei Ohtaki, "undated". "Asymmetric Liquidity Shocks and Optimality of the Freidman Rule," Working Papers e58, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    2. Eisei Ohtaki, "undated". "Nominal Idiosyncratic Shocks and Optimal Monetary Policy," Working Papers e57, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    3. Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Haslag, Joseph H. & Martin, Antoine, 2009. "Why does overnight liquidity cost more than intraday liquidity?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1236-1246, June.
    4. William A. Brock & Joseph H. Haslag, 2017. "To Fed Watch or Not to Fed Watch: Equilibrium Analysis of Bank System Dynamics," Working Papers 1712, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    5. Berentsen, Aleksander & Strub, Carlo, 2009. "Central bank design with heterogeneous agents," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 139-152, February.
    6. Matsuoka, Tarishi, 2012. "Imperfect interbank markets and the lender of last resort," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 1673-1687.
    7. Eisei Ohtaki, "undated". "Optimality of the Friedman rule under ambiguity," Working Papers e103, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    8. Tarishi Matsuoka, 2011. "Temporary Bubbles and Discount Window Policy," KIER Working Papers 802, Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research.
    9. Eisei Ohtaki, 2014. "Asymmetric liquidity shocks and optimal monetary policy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 1068-1080.
    10. Joseph H. Haslag & Joydeep Bhattacharya & Antoine Martin, 2007. "Money, output and the payment system: Optimal monetary policy in a model with hidden effort," Working Papers 0704, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.

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    Keywords

    Monetary policy ; Friedman; Milton ; Econometric models ; Equilibrium (Economics);

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