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Optimal Monetary Policy and Economic Growth

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  • Bhattacharya, Joydeep
  • Haslag, Joseph
  • Martin, Antoine

Abstract

This paper studies a overlapping generations economy with capital where limited communication and stochastic relocation create an endogenous transactions role for fiat money. We assume a production function with a knowledge-externality (Romer-style) that nests economies with endogenous growth (AK form) and those with no long run growth (the Diamond model). We show that the Tobin effect is always operative. Under CRRA preferences, irrespective of the degree of risk aversion, we also show that for some positive inflation to be optimal and for the Friedman rule to be sub-optimal, it is sufficient (but not necessary) that there be a mild degree of social increasing returns

Suggested Citation

  • Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Haslag, Joseph & Martin, Antoine, 2009. "Optimal Monetary Policy and Economic Growth," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12413, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:12413
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Levine, David K., 1991. "Asset trading mechanisms and expansionary policy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 148-164, June.
    3. Beatrix Paal & Bruce D. Smith, 2013. "The sub-optimality of the Friedman rule and the optimum quantity of money," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(2), pages 911-948, November.
    4. Bhattacharya, Joydeep & Haslag, Joseph H. & Martin, Antoine, 2006. "Sub-optimality of the Friedman rule in Townsend's turnpike and stochastic relocation models of money: Do finite lives and initial dates matter?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 879-897, May.
    5. Antinolfi, Gaetano & Huybens, Elisabeth & Keister, Todd, 2001. "Monetary Stability and Liquidity Crises: The Role of the Lender of Last Resort," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 99(1-2), pages 187-219, July.
    6. Joydeep Bhattacharya & Joseph H. Haslag & Antoine Martin, 2005. "Heterogeneity, Redistribution, And The Friedman Rule," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(2), pages 437-454, May.
    7. Maxim Nikitin & Steven Russell, 2006. "Monetary policy arithmetic: reconciling theory with evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 39(1), pages 348-374, February.
    8. R. Todd Smith, 1998. "The Friedman Rule and Optimal Monetary Policy," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 31(2), pages 295-302, May.
    9. Townsend, Robert M, 1987. "Economic Organization with Limited Communication," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(5), pages 954-971, December.
    10. Carl E. Walsh, 2003. "Monetary Theory and Policy, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232316, January.
    11. Weiss, Laurence M, 1980. "The Effects of Money Supply on Economic Welfare in the Steady State," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(3), pages 565-576, April.
    12. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    13. Joe Haslag & Joydeep Bhattacharya & Steven Russell, 2003. "Understanding the Roles of Money, or When is the Friedman Rule Optimal, and Why?," Working Papers 0301, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    14. Bruce Champ & Bruce D. Smith & Stephen D. Williamson, 1996. "Currency Elasticity and Banking Panics: Theory and Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 29(4), pages 828-864, November.
    15. McCallum, Bennett T., 1990. "Inflation: Theory and evidence," Handbook of Monetary Economics,in: B. M. Friedman & F. H. Hahn (ed.), Handbook of Monetary Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 18, pages 963-1012 Elsevier.
    16. Stacey L. Schreft & Bruce D. Smith, 1998. "The Effects of Open Market Operations in a Model of Intermediation and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 519-550.
    17. Theodore Palivos, 1999. "Optimal Monetary Policy with Heterogeneous Agents: Is There a Case for Inflation?," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 353, Society for Computational Economics.
    18. Jayasri Dutta & Sandeep Kapur, 1998. "Liquidity Preference and Financial Intermediation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(3), pages 551-572.
    19. Theodore Palivos, 2005. "Optimal monetary policy with heterogeneous agents: a case for inflation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 57(1), pages 34-50, January.
    20. Bruce D. Smith, 2002. "Monetary Policy, Banking Crises, and the Friedman Rule," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 128-134, May.
    21. Walsh, Carl E, 2003. " Accountability, Transparency, and Inflation Targeting," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(5), pages 829-849, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ryoji Hiraguchi, 2014. "Optimal Monetary Policy in OLG Models with Long-Lived Agents: A Note," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 16(1), pages 164-172, February.
    2. Wan, Jing & Zhang, Jie, 2016. "Money and growth through innovation cycles with leisure," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 148(C), pages 23-26.
    3. Wang, Gaowang & Zou, Heng-fu, 2011. "Inflation aversion and macroeconomic policy in a perfect foresight monetary model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1802-1807, July.
    4. Firouz Gahvari, 2009. "Friedman Rule in a Model with Endogenous Growth and Cash-in-advance Constraint," CESifo Working Paper Series 2708, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Tarishi Matsuoka, 2011. "Monetary Policy and Banking Structure," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43(6), pages 1109-1129, September.
    6. Eisei Ohtaki, "undated". "Optimality of the Friedman rule under ambiguity," Working Papers e103, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    7. Yasuoka, Masaya, 2016. "Money and Pay-As-you-Go Pension," MPRA Paper 75578, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. repec:bpj:bejtec:v:17:y:2017:i:2:p:14:n:5 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Friedman rule; Tobin effect; monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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