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Heterogeneity and risk sharking in village economies

Author

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  • Pierre-Andre Chiappori
  • Krislert Samphantharak
  • Sam Schulhofer-Wohl
  • Robert M. Townsend

Abstract

We show how to use panel data on household consumption to directly estimate households? risk preferences. Specifically, we measure heterogeneity in risk aversion among households in Thai villages using a full risk-sharing model, which we then test allowing for this heterogeneity. There is substantial, statistically significant heterogeneity in estimated risk preferences. Full insurance cannot be rejected. As the risk sharing, as-if-complete-markets theory might predict, estimated risk preferences are unrelated to wealth or other characteristics. The heterogeneity matters for policy: Although the average household would benefit from eliminating village-level risk, less-risk-averse households who are paid to absorb that risk would be worse off by several percent of household consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Andre Chiappori & Krislert Samphantharak & Sam Schulhofer-Wohl & Robert M. Townsend, 2013. "Heterogeneity and risk sharking in village economies," Staff Report 483, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmsr:483
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Thailand;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D53 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Financial Markets
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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