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Estimates of the size and source of price declines due to nearby foreclosures: evidence from San Francisco

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  • Elliot Anenberg
  • Edward Kung

Abstract

Using a novel dataset which merges real estate listings with real estate transactions in San Francisco from 2007-2009, we present new evidence that foreclosures causally depress nearby home prices. We show that this decrease occurs only after the foreclosed home is listed for sale, which suggests that the effect is due to the additional housing supply created by foreclosure rather than from neglect of the foreclosed property. Consistent with a framework where a foreclosed home simply increases supply, we find that new listings of foreclosed homes and non-foreclosed homes each lower sales prices of homes within 0.1 miles of the listing by 1 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Elliot Anenberg & Edward Kung, 2012. "Estimates of the size and source of price declines due to nearby foreclosures: evidence from San Francisco," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-84, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2012-84
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kristopher S. Gerardi & Eric Rosenblatt & Paul S. Willen & Vincent W. Yao, 2012. "Foreclosure externalities: some new evidence," Public Policy Discussion Paper 12-5, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Robert Novy‐Marx, 2009. "Hot and Cold Markets," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 37(1), pages 1-22, March.
    3. François Ortalo-Magné & Sven Rady, 2006. "Housing Market Dynamics: On the Contribution of Income Shocks and Credit Constraints ," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(2), pages 459-485.
    4. Zhenguo Lin & Eric Rosenblatt & Vincent Yao, 2009. "Spillover Effects of Foreclosures on Neighborhood Property Values," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(4), pages 387-407, May.
    5. Krainer, John, 2001. "A Theory of Liquidity in Residential Real Estate Markets," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 32-53, January.
    6. Springer, Thomas M, 1996. "Single-Family Housing Transactions: Seller Motivations, Price, and Marketing Time," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 237-254, November.
    7. Geoffrey Turnbull & Jonathan Dombrow, 2006. "Spatial Competition and Shopping Externalities: Evidence from the Housing Market," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 391-408, June.
    8. Hartley, Daniel, 2014. "The effect of foreclosures on nearby housing prices: Supply or dis-amenity?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 108-117.
    9. Harding, John P. & Rosenblatt, Eric & Yao, Vincent W., 2009. "The contagion effect of foreclosed properties," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 164-178, November.
    10. John Y. Campbell & Stefano Giglio & Parag Pathak, 2011. "Forced Sales and House Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 2108-2131, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Janice Eberly & Arvind Krishnamurthy, 2014. "Efficient Credit Policies in a Housing Debt Crisis," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 49(2 (Fall)), pages 73-136.
    2. Sonya Williams & George Galster & Nandita Verma, 2013. "Home Foreclosures as Early Warning Indicator of Neighborhood Decline," Journal of the American Planning Association, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 79(3), pages 201-210, July.
    3. Janice Eberly & Arvind Krishnamurthy, 2014. "Efficient Credit Policies in a Housing Debt Crisis," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 45(2 (Fall)), pages 73-136.
    4. Timothy Jones & Dean Gatzlaff & G. Stacy Sirmans, 2016. "Housing Market Dynamics: Disequilibrium, Mortgage Default, and Reverse Mortgages," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 269-281, October.

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