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Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries

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  • Yueh-Yun C. O’Brien

Abstract

This paper compares the reserve requirements of OECD countries. Reserve requirements are the minimum percentages or amounts of liabilities that depository institutions are required to keep in cash or as deposits with their central banks. To facilitate monetary policy implementation, twenty-four of the thirty OECD countries impose reserve requirements to influence their banking systems’ demand for liquidity. These include twelve OECD countries that are also members of the European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and twelve non-EMU OECD countries. All EMU countries employ a single reserve requirement system, which is treated as one entity. ; The reserve requirement system for each of the twelve non-EMU countries is discussed separately. The similarities and differences among the thirteen reserve requirement systems are highlighted. The features of reserve requirements covered include: reservable liabilities, required reserve ratios, reserve computation periods, reserve maintenance periods, types of reserve requirements, calculations of required reserves, eligible assets for satisfying reserve requirements, remuneration on reserve balances, non-compliance penalties, carry-over of reserve balances, and required clearing balances.

Suggested Citation

  • Yueh-Yun C. O’Brien, 2007. "Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-54, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2007-54
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Whitesell, William, 2006. "Interest rate corridors and reserves," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(6), pages 1177-1195, September.
    2. James A. Clouse & Douglas W. Elmendorf, 1997. "Declining required reserves and the volatility of the federal funds rate," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-30, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Kevin Clinton, 1997. "Implementation of Monetary Policy in a Regime with Zero Reserve Requirements," Staff Working Papers 97-8, Bank of Canada.
    4. Gordon H. Sellon & Stuart E. Weiner, 1997. "Monetary policy without reserve requirements : case studies and options for the United States," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 5-30.
    5. Jan Frazer, 2004. "Liquidity management in the New Zealand banking system," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 67, December.
    6. William C. Whitesell, 2003. "Tunnels and reserves in monetary policy implementation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-28, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. William C. Whitesell, 2006. "Monetary policy implementation without averaging or rate corridors," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2006-22, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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    Cited by:

    1. Nautz, Dieter & Schmidt, Sandra, 2009. "Monetary policy implementation and the federal funds rate," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1274-1284, July.
    2. Guonan Ma & Yan Xiandong & Liu Xi, 2013. "China’s evolving reserve requirements," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 117-137, May.

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    Keywords

    Bank reserves;

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