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Monetary policy implementation without averaging or rate corridors

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  • William C. Whitesell

Abstract

Most central banks now implement monetary policy by trying to hit a target overnight interest rate using one of two types of frameworks. The first involves arrangements for depository institutions to hold a minimum account balance over a multi-day averaging period. The second uses the central bank's lending rate as a ceiling and its deposit rate as a floor for overnight interest rates. Either averaging or a rate corridor can help a central bank hit a target interest rate, but each framework can also have weaknesses in achieving that goal and, in some cases, other associated drawbacks. This paper discusses an alternative possible policy implementation regime, involving a specially designed facility for the payment of interest on a daily basis on balances held at the central bank. This new type of regime could potentially allow smooth monetary policy implementation without the problems associated with averaging or a rate corridor.

Suggested Citation

  • William C. Whitesell, 2006. "Monetary policy implementation without averaging or rate corridors," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2006-22, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2006-22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Whitesell, William, 2006. "Interest rate corridors and reserves," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(6), pages 1177-1195, September.
    2. Hamilton, James D, 1997. "Measuring the Liquidity Effect," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 80-97, March.
    3. Seth B. Carpenter & Selva Demiralp, 2006. "Anticipation of Monetary Policy and Open Market Operations," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 2(2), May.
    4. Hamilton, James D, 1996. "The Daily Market for Federal Funds," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(1), pages 26-56, February.
    5. Carpenter, Seth & Demiralp, Selva, 2006. "The Liquidity Effect in the Federal Funds Market: Evidence from Daily Open Market Operations," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(4), pages 901-920, June.
    6. Brian Madigan & William R. Nelson, 2002. "Proposed Revision to the Federal Reserve's Discount Window Lending Programs," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), vol. 88(7), pages .313-319, July.
    7. Michael Woodford, 2001. "Monetary policy in the information economy," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 297-370.
    8. Scott Freeman & Joseph H. Haslag, 1996. "On the optimality of interest-bearing reserves in economies of overlapping generations (*)," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 7(3), pages 557-565.
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    Cited by:

    1. Abbassi, Puriya & Bräuning, Falk & Schulze, Niels, 2017. "Bargaining power and outside options in the interbank lending market," Discussion Papers 31/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    2. Martin, Antoine & Monnet, Cyril, 2011. "Monetary Policy Implementation Frameworks: A Comparative Analysis," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(S1), pages 145-189, April.
    3. ANTOINE MARTIN & JAMES McANDREWS, 2010. "Should There Be Intraday Money Markets?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(1), pages 110-122, January.
    4. Yueh-Yun C. O'Brien, 2007. "Reserve requirement systems in OECD countries," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-54, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    5. Karel Brůna, 2010. "Monetary Policy Implementation and Liquidity Management of the Czech Banking System," European Financial and Accounting Journal, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2010(3), pages 15-41.

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    Keywords

    Monetary policy; Interest rates;

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