IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedgfe/1998-25.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Is mortgage lending by savings associations special?

Author

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate whether elimination of the savings association charter might reduce lending to nontraditional mortgage borrowers. We present a theoretical model of lender portfolio choice, in which nontraditional lenders have some market power and traditional lenders are price-takers in the mortgage market. The comparative statics indicate differences between nontraditional and traditional lenders in terms of their asset allocation responses to changes in borrower income and house prices. Empirical tests indicate the absence of such differences between savings associations and commercial banks, suggesting that elimination of the savings association charter would not impair lending to nontraditional mortgage borrowers.

Suggested Citation

  • Elizabeth Laderman & Wayne Passmore, 1998. "Is mortgage lending by savings associations special?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1998-25, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:1998-25
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/1998/199825/199825abs.html
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/1998/199825/199825pap.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jeremy C. Stein, 1993. "Prices and Trading Volume in the Housing Market: A Model with Downpayment Effects," NBER Working Papers 4373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Blinder, Alan S & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1983. "Money, Credit Constraints, and Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 297-302, May.
    3. Steven A. Sharpe, 1995. "Bank capitalization, regulation, and the credit crunch: a critical review of the research findings," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 95-20, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. Elizabeth Laderman & Wayne Passmore, 1998. "Is mortgage lending by savings associations special?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 30-46.
    5. James A. Berkovec & Glenn B. Canner & Stuart A. Gabriel & Timothy H. Hannan, 1998. "Discrimination, Competition, And Loan Performance In Fha Mortgage Lending," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(2), pages 241-250, May.
    6. Jeremy C. Stein, 1995. "Prices and Trading Volume in the Housing Market: A Model with Down-Payment Effects," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(2), pages 379-406.
    7. Wayne Passmore, 1991. "Can retail depositories fund mortgages profitably?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 175, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Wayne Passmore & Steven A. Sharpe, 1994. "Optimal bank portfolios and the credit crunch," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 94-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    9. Glenn B. Canner & Wayne Passmore & Brian J. Surette, 1996. "Distribution of credit risk among providers of mortgages to lower- income and minority homebuyers," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Dec, pages 1077-1102.
    10. James R. Barth, 1991. "The Great Savings and Loan Debacle," Books, American Enterprise Institute, number 918256, September.
    11. Ravi Jagannathan & Ellen R. McGrattan, 1995. "The CAPM debate," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, vol. 19(Fall), pages 2-17.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Elizabeth Laderman & Wayne Passmore, 1998. "Is mortgage lending by savings associations special?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 30-46.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Elizabeth Laderman & Wayne Passmore, 2000. "Do Savings Associations Have a Special Commitment to Housing?," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 17(1), pages 41-68, February.
    2. François Ortalo-Magné & Sven Rady, 2006. "Housing Market Dynamics: On the Contribution of Income Shocks and Credit Constraints ," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(2), pages 459-485.
    3. Sewin Chan, 1998. "Spatial Lock-in: Do Falling House Prices Constrain Residential Mobility?," Departmental Working Papers 199816, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    4. Fracois Ortalo-Magne & Sven Rady, 2000. "Why are Housing Prices so Volatile? Income Shocks in a Stochastic Heterogeneous-Agents Model," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1352, Econometric Society.
    5. Baker, Malcolm & Stein, Jeremy C., 2004. "Market liquidity as a sentiment indicator," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 271-299, June.
    6. Hallberg, Daniel & Johansson, Per, 2002. "Turnover and Price in the Housing Market: Causation, Association or Independence?," Working Paper Series 2002:12, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Chris Downing & Richard Stanton & Nancy Wallace, 2003. "An empirical test of a two-factor mortgage valuation model: how much do house prices matter?," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2003-42, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Charles Ka Yui Leung & Nan-Kuang Chen, 2006. "Intrinsic Cycles of Land Price: A Simple Model," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(3), pages 293-320.
    9. Wayne Passmore & Roger Sparks, 1997. "The effect of automated underwriting on the profitability of mortgage securitization," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1997-19, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. repec:cdl:ucsdec:99-07r is not listed on IDEAS
    11. de Wit, Erik R. & Englund, Peter & Francke, Marc K., 2013. "Price and transaction volume in the Dutch housing market," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 220-241.
    12. Philippe Bracke & Silvana Tenreyro, 2021. "History Dependence in the Housing Market," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 420-443, April.
    13. George J. Benston & George G. Kaufman, 1997. "FDICIA after five years: a review and evaluation," Working Paper Series, Issues in Financial Regulation WP-97-01, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    14. repec:pri:indrel:dsp0141687h476 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. S. Wong & C. Yiu & K. Chau, 2013. "Trading Volume-Induced Spatial Autocorrelation in Real Estate Prices," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 596-608, May.
    16. David Genesove & Christopher Mayer, 2001. "Loss Aversion and Seller Behavior: Evidence from the Housing Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1233-1260.
    17. Craig Furfine, 2001. "Bank Portfolio Allocation: The Impact of Capital Requirements, Regulatory Monitoring, and Economic Conditions," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 20(1), pages 33-56, September.
    18. Lee, Gabriel S., 1999. "Housing Investment Dynamics, Period of Production, and Adjustment Costs," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 1-25, March.
    19. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1997. "The Limits of Arbitrage," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(1), pages 35-55, March.
    20. Barberis, Nicholas & Xiong, Wei, 2012. "Realization utility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 251-271.
    21. Quigley, John M., 2002. "Transactions Costs and Housing Markets," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt6pz8p6zt, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
    22. Takatoshi Ito & Tokuo Iwaisako, 1996. "Explaining Asset Bubbles in Japan," Monetary and Economic Studies, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, vol. 14(1), pages 143-193, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Savings and loan associations; Mortgages;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:1998-25. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.