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Banking and finance in Argentina in the period 1900-35

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  • Leonard Nakamura
  • Carlos E.J.M. Zarazaga

Abstract

From 1900 to 1935, Argentina evolved from an economy highly dependent on external, primarily British, finance to one more nearly self-sufficient. We examine the failure of domestic finance to adequately fill the void left by the decline of London and the breakdown of the world financial system in the interwar period, when neither the Buenos Aires Bolsa nor the private domestic banks developed rapidly enough to fully replace British investors as efficient channels for financing private investment. One consequence is that Argentine investable funds were increasingly concentrated in a single institution, the Banco de la Nacion Argentina (BNA), creating a lopsided financial structure that was vulnerable to rent seeking and to authoritarian capture. Nevertheless, several measures, including gold reserves, interest rates, money supply, bank credit, and the market capitalization of domestic corporations, attest to the very high level of financial development achieved by Argentina. ; Economic Research Working Paper 0108

Suggested Citation

  • Leonard Nakamura & Carlos E.J.M. Zarazaga, 2001. "Banking and finance in Argentina in the period 1900-35," Center for Latin America Working Papers 0501, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddcl:0501
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    File URL: http://dallasfed.org/assets/documents/research/claepapers/2001/lawp0105.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Loretta J. Mester & Leonard I. Nakamura & Micheline Renault, 1998. "Checking accounts and bank monitoring," Working Papers 98-25, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Milton Friedman & Anna Jacobson Schwartz, 1970. "Monetary Statistics of the United States: Estimates, Sources, Methods," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie70-1, January.
    3. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
    4. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Levine, Ross, 1993. "Stock market development and financial intermediary growth : a research agenda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1159, The World Bank.
    5. Leonard I. Nakamura & Carlos E. Zarazaga, 1997. "Economic growth in Argentina in the period 1900-30: some evidence from stock returns," Working Papers 97-22, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    6. Douglas W. Diamond, 1984. "Financial Intermediation and Delegated Monitoring," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(3), pages 393-414.
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    1. repec:eee:reecon:v:71:y:2017:i:3:p:384-398 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Reinhart, Carmen M. & Rogoff, Kenneth S., 2013. "Banking crises: An equal opportunity menace," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4557-4573.
    3. Barro, Robert J. & Ursúa, José F., 2017. "Stock-market crashes and depressions," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 384-398.

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    Keywords

    Financial crises - Latin America;

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