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European Social Models and Growth: Where are the Eastern European countries heading?

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Abstract

The authors find that as they seek to develop a social model both appropriate to their needs and consistent with EU standards, Eastern European countries must understand that a single European Social Model does not exist. Recently, some Eastern European unionists have begun to support their demands with reference to the European Social Model, which they only comprehend, however, in terms of its most inefficient Continental form. Eastern European countries must engage in a deeper public discussion of the pros and cons of various diverse social models, while taking into account the effects of different social models on the past and future competitiveness of the countries that have adopted them. Let those models compete to open opportunities based on forward-looking approach with full respect to the minimum harmonized standards (such as social safety net etc.) instead of fixing the past.

Suggested Citation

  • Julie Chytilová & Michal Mejstøík, 2007. "European Social Models and Growth: Where are the Eastern European countries heading?," Working Papers IES 2007/24, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Aug 2007.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:wpaper:wp2007_24
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    File URL: http://ies.fsv.cuni.cz/default/file/download/id/7200
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Juan C. Botero & Simeon Djankov & Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "The Regulation of Labor," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(4), pages 1339-1382.
    2. Scharpf, Fritz W., 2002. "The European Social Model: Coping with the challenges of diversity," MPIfG Working Paper 02/8, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    3. Colin Hay & Matthew Watson & Daniel Wincott, 1999. "Globalisation, European Integration and the Persistence of European Social Models," One Europe or Several? Working Papers 3, One-Europe Programme.
    4. André Sapir, 2006. "Globalization and the Reform of European Social Models," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(2), pages 369-390, June.
    5. Marcel Canoy* & Peter Smith*, 2006. "A Social and Economic Model for Europe," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 41(6), pages 314-327, November.
    6. Maria Jepsen & Amparo Serrano Pascual, 2005. "The European social model: An exercise in deconstruction," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/166129, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    7. Olivier Blanchard, 2004. "The Economic Future of Europe," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 3-26, Fall.
    8. Eamets, Raul & Masso, Jaan, 2004. "Labour Market Flexibility and Employment Protection Regulation in the Baltic States," IZA Discussion Papers 1147, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Takayama, Noriyuki, 2013. "Intergenerational Equity and the Gender Gap in Pension Issues," CIS Discussion paper series 605, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European social model; competitiveness; welfare; public goods;

    JEL classification:

    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • H4 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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