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Globalization and Food and Nutrition Security in the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Belarus

Author

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  • David Sedik
  • Doris Wiesmann

Abstract

Despite falling per capita incomes in these countries, globalization has probably not led to a deterioration of food security in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. Measures of food inadequacy in these countries are significantly lower than in developing countries. The majority of the most severe nutritional problems in the Russian Federation—overweight and obesity in adults and various micronutrient deficiencies in both adults and children—are the same as they were during the Soviet era and are linked to diets. For children, these are low rates of breast feeding, possible deficiencies in weaning practices, a lack of vitamin C and iron deficiencies. For adults, the most severe problems are caused by a high-fat, high cholesterol, low fiber diet. This includes low consumption of fruits and vegetables, high consumption of dairy and meat and sugar and higher than recommended alcohol (for males) consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • David Sedik & Doris Wiesmann, 2003. "Globalization and Food and Nutrition Security in the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Belarus," Working Papers 03-04, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  • Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0304
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    File URL: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/007/ae037e/ae037e00.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William M. Liefert, 2002. "Comparative (Dis?) Advantage in Russian Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(3), pages 762-767.
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    Cited by:

    1. Herzfeld, Thomas & Huffman, Sonya & Rizov, Marian, 2014. "The dynamics of food, alcohol and cigarette consumption in Russia during transition," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 128-143.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Belarus; Children; Food production; Food security; Globalization; Household food security; Human nutrition; Living standards; Malnutrition; Nutrition policies; Nutritional status; Russian Federation; Statistical data; Ukraine;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions

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