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Science and Economics for Sustainable Development o f India

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  • U. Sankar

Abstract

This paper deals with the interface between science and economics in environmental policy making in India. It explains Nehru‘s concept of scientific temper and its influence in the formulation of science and technology policy and development of the science and technology system. It reviews the evolution of global environmental policy regime and the important role assigned to science to gain insights into ecological processes, to assess the nature and causes of environmental pollution and degradation, and to use scientific evidence as basis for formulation of environmental policies. Then it assesses the roles assigned to science and economics in formulation of policies relating to pollution prevention and control and management of natural resources in India. The implications of uncertainties and risks in environmental management are highlighted for public policy.

Suggested Citation

  • U. Sankar, 2013. "Science and Economics for Sustainable Development o f India," Working Papers id:5331, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:5331
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William D. Nordhaus, 2007. "A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 686-702, September.
    2. Pereira, Angela Guimaraes & Functowicz, Silvio., 2009. "Science for Policy: New Challenges, New Opportunities," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195698497.
    3. Martin L. Weitzman, 2009. "On Modeling and Interpreting the Economics of Catastrophic Climate Change," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(1), pages 1-19, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental Uncertainties and Risks; Natural resources Management; Pollution Prevention and Control; Scientific Temper; Sustainable Development; Science and Technology Systems; Environmental Policies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • P28 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Natural Resources; Environment

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