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Decomposing Spatial Differences in Poverty in India


  • Shatakshee Dhongde



Over the last decade, India has been one of the fastest growing economies, and has experienced considerable decline in overall income poverty. However, in a vast country like India, poverty levels vary significantly across the different states. In this paper, we analyze the differences between poverty at the state and national level, separately for the rural and urban sector, in the year 1999-2000. [ResearchPaperNo.2004/53]

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  • Shatakshee Dhongde, 2010. "Decomposing Spatial Differences in Poverty in India," Working Papers id:3267, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3267
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gaurav Datt & Martin Ravallion, 2002. "Is India's Economic Growth Leaving the Poor Behind?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 89-108, Summer.
    2. Dreze, Jean & Sen, Amartya, 2002. "India: Development and Participation," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199257492.
    3. Shatakshee Dhongde, 2007. "Measuring the Impact of Growth and Income Distribution on Poverty in India," Journal of Income Distribution, Journal of Income Distribution, vol. 16(2), pages 25-48, June.
    4. B. S. Minhas & L. R. Jain & S. M. Kansal & M. R. Saluja, 1987. "On the Choice of Appropriate Consumer Price Indices and Data Sets for Estimating the Incidence of Poverty in India," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 22(1), pages 19-49, January.
    5. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1992. "Growth and redistribution components of changes in poverty measures : A decomposition with applications to Brazil and India in the 1980s," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 275-295, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brijesh C. Purohit, 2015. "Health Policy, Inequity and Convergence in India," Working Papers id:7155, eSocialSciences.
    2. Brijesh C. Purohit, 2012. "Health Policy, Inequity and Convergence in India," Working Papers 2012-074, Madras School of Economics,Chennai,India.
    3. S. Mukherji, 2011. "Urban–rural Inequalities in South and South-East Asia: Colonial Policy Impacts and Current Spatial–Economic Disparities," Chapters,in: International Handbook of Urban Policy, Volume 3, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Irina Gerasimova, 2011. "Sources of Income as a Factor of Interregional Social Economic Differentiation of the Russian Population (1995 - 2007 years)," ERSA conference papers ersa10p378, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Chambers, Dustin & Wu, Ying & Yao, Hong, 2008. "The impact of past growth on poverty in Chinese provinces," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 348-357, August.

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    growth; income distribution; poverty; decomposition; India;

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