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GATS : Domestic Regulations versus Market Access

  • Suparna Karmakar
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    The paper highlights the dilemma faced by developing countries in balancing market access rights with the need to regulate service providers, in light of the ongoing negotiations under Article VI:4 of GATS that aims to discipline the regulatory freedom of WTO Members. While regulation is an essential development tool and regulatory requirements ensure that domestic consumers get qualitatively the best services, the very same tools often become insurmountable market access barriers for developing country service providers in the WTO regime of MFN. [WTO Research Series 7]

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    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:2903.

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    Date of creation: Sep 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2903
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    1. Walmsley, Terrie L. & Winters, L. Alan, 2005. "Relaxing the Restrictions on the Temporary Movement of Natural Persons: A Simulation Analysis," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 20, pages 688-726.
    2. Aaditya Mattoo & Pierre Sauve, 2003. "Domestic Regulation and Service Trade Liberalization," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15081, March.
    3. Roberta Piermartini & Marion Jansen, 2005. "The Impact of Mode 4 Liberalization on Bilateral Trade Flows," Working Papers id:290, eSocialSciences.
    4. Henk Kox & Arjan Lejour, 2005. "Regulatory heterogeneity as obstacle for international services trade," CPB Discussion Paper 49, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    5. World Bank, 2006. "Domestic Regulation and Global Movement of Skilled Professionals : A Case Study of Indian Professionals in the United States," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12933, The World Bank.
    6. Karmakar Suparna, 2007. "Services Trade Liberalisation and Domestic Regulations: The Developing Country Conundrum," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-47, February.
    7. Marchetti, Juan A., 2004. "Developing countries in the WTO services negotiations," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2004-06, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    8. Pauwelyn, Joost, 2005. "Rien ne Va Plus? Distinguishing domestic regulation from market access in GATT and GATS," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(02), pages 131-170, July.
    9. Chaudhuri, Sumanta & Mattoo, Aaditya & Self, Richard, 2004. "Moving people to deliver services : how can the WTO help?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3238, The World Bank.
    10. Bernard Hoekman, 2000. "The next round of services negotiations: identifying priorities and options," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 31-52.
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