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If at first you don't succeed? Fieldwork, panel attrition, and health-employment inferences in BHPS and HILDA

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  • Pudney, Stephen
  • Watson, Nicole

Abstract

We study the relationship between individuals’ participation in household panels, their health and employment states and the design of survey fieldwork procedures, using a comparative approach based on data from the UK BHPS and Australian HILDA Survey. We simulate the impact of alternative procedures for controlling fieldwork effort on the bias and precision of empirical findings, ranging from simple summary statistics to inferences from complex dynamic modelling. We allow for adaptive fieldwork designs linked to household size and the possible long-term consequences for sample integrity.

Suggested Citation

  • Pudney, Stephen & Watson, Nicole, 2013. "If at first you don't succeed? Fieldwork, panel attrition, and health-employment inferences in BHPS and HILDA," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-27, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2013-27
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2013-27.pdf
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    1. Joachim R. Frick & Stephen P. Jenkins & Dean R. Lillard & Oliver Lipps & Mark Wooden, 2007. "European Data Watch: The Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) and its Member Country Household Panel Studies," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(4), pages 627-654.
    2. Jonathan Burton & Heather Laurie & Peter Lynn, 2006. "The long-term effectiveness of refusal conversion procedures on longitudinal surveys," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(3), pages 459-478.
    3. Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
    4. Hall, Julia & Victoria, Brown & Nicolaas, Gerry & Lynn, Peter, 2011. "Extended field efforts to reduce the risk of non-response bias: do they pay off?," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Uhrig, S.C. Noah, 2008. "The nature and causes of attrition in the British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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