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How Restrictive Are ASEAN's Rules of Origins?

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  • Olivier Cadot
  • Lili Yan Ing

    (Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA))

Abstract

ASEAN's rules of origin (ROO) have a simple and transparent structure, with a large chunk of trade flows subject to a 40% regional value content or a change of tariff classification. The econometric analysis of trade flows discovers that the average ad-valorem equivalent (AVE) of ASEAN's ROO is 3.40% across all instruments and sectors. The trade-weighted average is 2.09%. This moderate estimate is in line with the existing literature. However, we also find fairly high AVEs for some sectors including leather, textile and apparel, footwear, and automobiles. We also find that some rules appear more restrictive than others; in this regard, the Textile Rule seems to stand out as a relatively more trade-inhibiting rule than others.

Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Cadot & Lili Yan Ing, 2017. "How Restrictive Are ASEAN's Rules of Origins?," Working Papers PB-2017-04, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
  • Handle: RePEc:era:wpaper:pb-2017-04
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    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2004. "Trade Costs," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 691-751, September.
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    5. Portugal-Perez, Alberto, 2009. "Assessing the impact of political economy factors on rules of origin under NAFTA," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4848, The World Bank.
    6. Céline Carrère & Jaime de Melo, 2015. "Are Different Rules of Origin Equally Costly? Estimates from NAFTA," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Developing Countries in the World Economy, chapter 12, pages 277-298 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. Antoni Estevadeordal & Kati Suominen & Jeremy Harris & José Ernesto López Córdova, 2008. "Gatekeepers of Global Commerce: Rules of Origin and International Economic Integration," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 16558, February.
    8. repec:idb:brikps:16558 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Aaditya Mattoo & Devesh Roy & Arvind Subramanian, 2003. "The Africa Growth and Opportunity Act and its Rules of Origin: Generosity Undermined?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(6), pages 829-851, June.
    10. Leamer, Edward E, 1974. "The Commodity Composition of International Trade in Manufactures: An Empirical Analysis," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 350-374, November.
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