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How Does Country Risk Matter for Foreign Direct Investment?

Author

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  • Kazunobu HAYAKAWA

    (Kazunobu HAYAKAWA Bangkok Research Center, Japan External Trade Organization, Thailand)

  • Fukunari KIMURA

    (Fukunari KIMURA Faculty of Economics, Keio University, Japan Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA))

  • Hyun-Hoon LEE

    (Hyun-Hoon LEE Department of International Trade and Business, Kangwon National University, Korea)

Abstract

In this paper we empirically investigate the effects on inward FDI of various components of political and financial risk. We also examine the relationship between inward FDI and not only the level of these risks but also their changes over time. Two kinds of findings are noteworthy. One is that among the political and financial risks, only the political risk is associated with the FDI inflow. Specifically, the change in the level of political risk affects FDI inflows, while the initial level of political risk does not. The other is that, particularly in the case of developing countries, payment delays, contract expropriation, and corruption are negatively associated with the FDI inflow. However, significant improvement leads to increased FDI inflow, even if initial levels are high.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazunobu HAYAKAWA & Fukunari KIMURA & Hyun-Hoon LEE, 2012. "How Does Country Risk Matter for Foreign Direct Investment?," Working Papers DP-2012-03, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia (ERIA).
  • Handle: RePEc:era:wpaper:dp-2012-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fathi Ali & Norbert Fiess & Ronald MacDonald, 2010. "Do Institutions Matter for Foreign Direct Investment?," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 201-219, April.
    2. Noorbakhsh, Farhad & Paloni, Alberto & Youssef, Ali, 2001. "Human Capital and FDI Inflows to Developing Countries: New Empirical Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1593-1610, September.
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    4. Bruce Blonigen, 2005. "A Review of the Empirical Literature on FDI Determinants," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 33(4), pages 383-403, December.
    5. Gastanaga, Victor M. & Nugent, Jeffrey B. & Pashamova, Bistra, 1998. "Host Country Reforms and FDI Inflows: How Much Difference do they Make?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(7), pages 1299-1314, July.
    6. Ivar Kolstad & Espen Villanger, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment in the Caribbean," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 26(1), pages 79-89, January.
    7. Asiedu, Elizabeth, 2002. "On the Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment to Developing Countries: Is Africa Different?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 107-119, January.
    8. Shang-Jin Wei, 2000. "Local Corruption and Global Capital Flows," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 31(2), pages 303-354.
    9. Laura Resmini, 2000. "The Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in the CEECs: New evidence from sectoral patterns," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 8(3), pages 665-689, November.
    10. Joe Stone & Hyun-Hoon Lee, 1995. "Determinants of intra-industry trade: A longitudinal, cross-country analysis," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 131(1), pages 67-85, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Guych NURYYEV & Charles HICKSON, 2015. "Corruption Centralization, Investments, and Growth: Analysis of 62 countries for 1995-2007," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 15(1), pages 17-30.
    2. Akpan, Uduak & Isihak, Salisu & Asongu, Simplice, 2014. "Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Fast-Growing Economies: A Study of BRICS and MINT," MPRA Paper 56810, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Zeinab Asqari, 2014. "Investors Legitimate Expectations and the Interests of the Host State in Foreign Investment," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 4(12), pages 1906-1918, December.
    4. Lee, Hyun-Hoon & Park, Donghyun & Wang, Jing, 2013. "Different types of firms, different types of products, and their dynamics: An anatomy of China's imports," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 62-77.
    5. Liu, Chang & Sun, Xiaolei & Chen, Jianming & Li, Jianping, 2016. "Statistical properties of country risk ratings under oil price volatility: Evidence from selected oil-exporting countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 234-245.
    6. Lindner, Thomas & Muellner, Jakob & Puck, Jonas, 2016. "Cost of Capital in an International Context: Institutional Distance, Quality, and Dynamics," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 234-248.
    7. Kechagia, Polyxeni & Metaxas, Theodore, 2017. "FDI and Terrorism in the developing Asian countries: A panel data analysis," MPRA Paper 80945, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Metaxas, Theodore & Kechagia, Polyxeni, 2017. "FDI and Terrorism in developing Asia: Approaches and Discussion," MPRA Paper 78165, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:jed:journl:v:42:y:2017:i:2:p:17-37 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis

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