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Towards More Resilient Economies: The role of well-functioning economic structures

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  • Sondermann, David

Abstract

Economic resilience is essential to withstand adverse shocks and reduce the economic costs associated with them, argues the author of this CEPS Working Document. He proposes different measures of resilience and gauges how countries differ in their shock absorption capacity, while controlling for the quality of their economic structures. The paper finds robust evidence that sound labour and product markets, framework conditions and political institutions increase resilience to adverse shocks and reduce the incidence of crisis more generally. In the presence of a common shock, a country with weaker economic structures can, on average, suffer up to twice the output loss in a given year compared to a country with sound institutional parameters. Similarly, the likelihood of a severe economic crisis is reduced if a country exhibits flexible and adaptable institutions. The proposed measures can be used to establish a governance process for more resilient economic structures, as suggested for the euro area in the so-called Five Presidents’ Report. JEL classification: E32, L50, J21.

Suggested Citation

  • Sondermann, David, 2017. "Towards More Resilient Economies: The role of well-functioning economic structures," CEPS Papers 12173, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:12173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    2. Rodrik, Dani, 1999. "Where Did All the Growth Go? External Shocks, Social Conflict, and Growth Collapses," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 385-412, December.
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    4. Biroli, Pietro & Mourre, Gilles & Turrini, Alessandro Antonio, 2010. "Adjustment in the Euro Area and Regulation of Product and Labour Markets: An Empirical Assessment," CEPR Discussion Papers 8010, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Acemoglu, Daron & Johnson, Simon & Robinson, James & Thaicharoen, Yunyong, 2003. "Institutional causes, macroeconomic symptoms: volatility, crises and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 49-123, January.
    6. Mikkel Hermansen & Oliver Röhn, 2017. "Economic resilience: The usefulness of early warning indicators in OECD countries," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2016(1), pages 9-35.
    7. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 1-33, March.
    8. Agnès Bénassy-Quéré & Maylis Coupet & Thierry Mayer, 2007. "Institutional Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(5), pages 764-782, May.
    9. Stephen Nickell, 1997. "Unemployment and Labor Market Rigidities: Europe versus North America," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 55-74, Summer.
    10. repec:eee:jpolmo:v:39:y:2017:i:6:p:1065-1085 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Romain Duval & Lukas Vogel, 2008. "Economic resilience to shocks: The role of structural policies," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2008(1), pages 1-38.
    12. Carmeci, Gaetano & Mauro, Luciano, 2003. "Imperfect labor market and convergence: theory and evidence for some OECD countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(8), pages 837-856, November.
    13. Sondermann, David, 2018. "Towards more resilient economies: The role of well-functioning economic structures," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 97-117.
    14. Oliver Röhn & Aida Caldera Sánchez & Mikkel Hermansen & Morten Rasmussen, 2015. "Economic resilience: A new set of vulnerability indicators for OECD countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1249, OECD Publishing.
    15. Calderón, César & Fuentes, J. Rodrigo, 2012. "Removing the constraints for growth: Some guidelines," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 948-970.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sondermann, David, 2018. "Towards more resilient economies: The role of well-functioning economic structures," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 97-117.
    2. Alessi, Lucia & Benczur, Peter & Campolongo, Francesca & Cariboni, Jessica & Manca, Anna Rita & Menyhert, Balint & Pagano, Andrea, 2018. "The resilience of EU Member States to the financial and economic crisis. What are the characteristics of resilient behaviour?," JRC Working Papers JRC111606, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    3. Da Silva, Antonio Dias & Givone, Audrey & Sondermann, David, 2017. "When do countries implement structural reforms?," Working Paper Series 2078, European Central Bank.
    4. repec:ana:journl:v:3:y:2017:i:2:p:3-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Pierluigi, Beatrice & Sondermann, David, 2018. "Macroeconomic imbalances in the euro area: where do we stand?," Occasional Paper Series 211, European Central Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic resilience; common shocks; economic structures; institutions.;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • L50 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - General
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

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