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How To Be Better Prepared For A Paradigm Shift In Economic Theory, And Write Better Articles In The Meantime

Listed author(s):
  • Welch, P.
  • Dolfsma, W.A.

The development of economic thought is not unlike the development of technological knowledge: paradigms can be discerned over time and across the field. Indeed, in its history economics has experienced paradigm shifts. There is no reason why it will not do so again in the future. In technology, as in economics, paradigms do not emerge from the blue, but build on precursors, possibly from fields other than our own discipline. Recognizing this draws our attention to other fields, preparing us for a possible paradigm shift. Understanding these other paradigms might best be done using historian Wight’s concepts of plot structure, myths, and cultural endowment. A better understanding of different paradigms allows us to combine ideas from other (sub-) fields with our own so that we are likely to come up with better ideas. In the meantime, as the parallel with the composition of music and the playing of chess shows, we compose better articles in the meantime because we are aware of the rules guiding our own compositions, yet. The history of our own field may be the first and best source for such inspiration.

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File URL: https://repub.eur.nl/pub/1811/ERS%202004%20101%20ORG.pdf
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Paper provided by Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam in its series ERIM Report Series Research in Management with number ERS-2004-101-ORG.

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Date of creation: 26 Nov 2004
Handle: RePEc:ems:eureri:1811
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RSM Erasmus University & Erasmus School of Economics, PoBox 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam

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  1. van den Ende, Jan & Kemp, Rene, 1999. "Technological transformations in history: how the computer regime grew out of existing computing regimes," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(8), pages 833-851, November.
  2. Backhouse, Roger E., 1992. "How Should We Approach the History of Economic Thought, Fact, Fiction or Moral Tale?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(01), pages 18-35, March.
  3. Leydesdorff, Loet & Dolfsma, Wilfred & Van der Panne, Gerben, 2006. "Measuring the knowledge base of an economy in terms of triple-helix relations among 'technology, organization, and territory'," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 181-199, March.
  4. Jan Ende & Wilfred Dolfsma, 2004. "Technology-push, demand-pull and the shaping of technological paradigms - Patterns in the development of computing technology," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 83-99, January.
  5. Barber, William J., 1967. "A History of Economic Thought," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number barber1967.
  6. Karin Knorr Cetina, 1991. "Epistemic Cultures: Forms of Reason in Science," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 105-122, Spring.
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