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No History of Ideas, Please, We're Economists

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  • Mark Blaug

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  • Mark Blaug, 2001. "No History of Ideas, Please, We're Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 145-164, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:15:y:2001:i:1:p:145-164
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.15.1.145
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.15.1.145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. repec:ucp:bkecon:9780226199993 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mark Blaug, 1999. "Misunderstanding Classical Economics: The Sraffian Interpretation of the Surplus Approach," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 31(2), pages 213-236, Summer.
    5. Laidler,David, 1999. "Fabricating the Keynesian Revolution," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521641739, June.
    6. Mark Blaug, 1991. "The Historiography of Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 632.
    7. Bernard A. Corry, 1975. "Should Economists Abandon HOPE?," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 7(2), pages 252-260, Summer.
    8. Blaug,Mark, 1997. "Economic Theory in Retrospect," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521577014, June.
    9. Mark Blaug, 1997. "Not Only an Economist," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1122.
    10. Barber, William J., 1990. "Does Scholarship in the History of Economics Have a Useful Future?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 110-123, October.
    11. Wible James, 1998. "The Economics Of Science, Methodology And Epistemology As If Economics Really Matter," Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines, De Gruyter, vol. 8(4), pages 1-18, December.
    12. Backhouse, Roger E., 1992. "How Should We Approach the History of Economic Thought, Fact, Fiction or Moral Tale?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(1), pages 18-35, April.
    13. Kenneth E. Boulding, 1971. "After Samuelson, Who Needs Adam Smith?," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 3(2), pages 225-237, Fall.
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    15. Winch,Donald, 1996. "Riches and Poverty," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521559201, June.
    16. Samuelson, Paul A. & Patinkin, Don & Blaug, Mark, 1991. "On the Historiography of Economics: A Correspondence," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 144-158, October.
    17. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1996. "Nobel Lecture: Monetary Neutrality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 661-682, August.
    18. Thomas Mayer, 1980. "David Hume and Monetarism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 95(1), pages 89-101.
    19. John Pullen, 1998. "The Last Sixty-Five Years of Malthus Scholarship," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 30(2), pages 343-352, Summer.
    20. David E.W. Laidler, 2016. "The Golden Age of the Quantity Theory," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 4959.
    21. Krueger, Anne O, et al, 1991. "Report of the Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1035-1053, September.
    22. Vaughn, Karen I., 1993. "Why Teach the History of Economics?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 174-183, October.
    23. George J. Stigler, 1969. "Does Economics Have a Useful Past?," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 1(2), pages 217-230, Fall.
    24. Keith Tribe, 1999. "Adam Smith: Critical Theorist?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(2), pages 609-632, June.
    25. Roger E. Backhouse & John Creedy (ed.), 1999. "From Classical Economics to the Theory of the Firm," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1824.
    26. Usher, Dan, 1998. "The Coase theorem is tautological, incoherent or wrong," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 3-11, October.
    27. Elias L. Khalil, 1995. "Has Economics Progressed? Rectilinear, Historicist, Universalist, and Evolutionary Historiographies," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 27(1), pages 43-87, Spring.
    28. Lowry, S. Todd, 1991. "Are there Limits to the Past in the History of Economic Thought?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 134-143, October.
    29. Barber, William J., 1967. "A History of Economic Thought," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, number barber1967.
    30. Steven G. Medema & Warren J. Samuels (ed.), 1996. "Foundations of Research in Economics: How do Economists do Economics?," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 899.
    31. Steven G. Medema (ed.), 1995. "The Legacy Of Ronald Coase In Economic Analysis," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, volume 0, number 618.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B00 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - General - - - History of Economic Thought, Methodology, and Heterodox Approaches
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists

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