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What Did Smith Mean by the Invisible Hand?

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  • William D. Grampp

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  • William D. Grampp, 2000. "What Did Smith Mean by the Invisible Hand?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(3), pages 441-465, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:108:y:2000:i:3:p:441-465
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Cosmides, Leda & Tooby, John, 1994. "Better than Rational: Evolutionary Psychology and the Invisible Hand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 327-332, May.
    2. Persky, Joseph, 1989. "Adam Smith's Invisible Hands," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 195-201, Fall.
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    Cited by:

    1. N. Emrah Aydinonat, 2006. "Is the Invisible Hand un− Smithian? A Comment on Rothschild," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 2(2), pages 1-9.
    2. Christopher Robertson & K. Gilley & William Crittenden, 2008. "Trade Liberalization, Corruption, and Software Piracy," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 78(4), pages 623-634, April.
    3. Avner Offer, 2012. "Self-interest, Sympathy and the Invisible Hand : From Adam Smith to Market Liberalism," Economic Thought, World Economics Association, vol. 1(2), pages 1-1, December.
    4. Robert B. Ekelund Jr & Edward O. Price III, 2012. "The Economics of Edwin Chadwick," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14915, December.
    5. Ricardo Kerguelén Méndez, 2016. "[Ensayo] Liberalismo e instituciones: Douglass North y la economía neoclásica," REVISTA ECONOMÍA & REGIÓN, UNIVERSIDAD TECNOLÓGICA DE BOLÍVAR, vol. 10(1), pages 249-290, June.
    6. Mark Blaug, 2001. "No History of Ideas, Please, We're Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(1), pages 145-164, Winter.
    7. Enrico Colombatto, 2014. "Hayek and economic policy (the Austrian road to the third way)," Chapters,in: Elgar Companion to Hayekian Economics, chapter 15, pages 343-363 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Emiel F.M. Wubben, 2011. "Do Rules and Regulations Bind or Boost Economic Growth?," Chapters,in: Institutions and Regulation for Economic Growth?, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Madarász, Aladár, 2014. "A láthatatlan kéz - szemelvények egy metafora történetéből
      [The invisible hand - extracts from the history of a metaphor]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(7), pages 801-844.
    10. Krawiec Alexandra E., 2016. "Socio-Economic Implications of Female Inclusion in Organizational Structures and in Leadership Positions," International Journal of Management and Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of World Economy, vol. 49(1), pages 106-134, March.
    11. repec:kap:jbuset:v:147:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s10551-017-3506-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Yann Giraud & Pedro Garcia Duarte, 2014. "Chasing the B: A Bibliographic Account of Economics’ Relation to its Past, 1991-2011," THEMA Working Papers 2014-09, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    13. David Bevan & Patricia Werhane, 2015. "The Inexorable Sociality of Commerce: The Individual and Others in Adam Smith," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 127(2), pages 327-335, March.
    14. Avner Offer, 2012. "Self-interest, Sympathy and the Invisible Hand: From Adam Smith to Market Liberalism," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _101, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    15. Paul Oslington, 2012. "God and the Market: Adam Smith’s Invisible Hand," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 108(4), pages 429-438, July.
    16. repec:ucm:ijohet:v:4:y:2017:i:1:p:43-62 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Enrico Colombatto, 2004. "Hayek and Economic Policy (The Austrian Road to the Third Way)," ICER Working Papers 18-2004, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.

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